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Does treating tobacco addiction in persons with mental illness compromise their quality of life?

  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
  • In contrast to overall declining smoking rates, the high rates among persons with mental illness remain unchanged. They consume 44% of purchased cigarettes and are heavier, more addicted smokers. Smoking is the most salient risk factor for their premature death, estimated at 25 years. Chemicals in tobacco affect mental symptoms and neurobiological vulnerabilities, and increase the metabolism rate of many psychiatric medications resulting in increased dosages, costs, and side effects. Tobacco’s substantive costs are particularly problematic for persons with mental illness when lacking discretionary funds. Tobacco addiction treatment is effective in this population, particularly with combinations of motivational enhancement, cognitive behavioural, and pharmaceutical therapies. Yet treatment is often withheld out of concern quitting would negatively reduce their quality of life.

  • Date created
    2011
  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Type of Item
    Article (Published)
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3028PM2W
  • License
    © 2011 Covenant Health. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
  • Language
  • Citation for previous publication
    • Els C, Kunyk D. Does treating tobacco addiction in persons with mental illness compromise their quality of life?. Covenant Health Research 16. (2011), 4-5.