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Code optimization and detection of script conflicts in video games

  • Author / Creator
    Yang, Yi
  • Scripting languages have gained popularity in video games for specifying the interactive content in a story. Game designers do not necessarily possess programming skills and often demand code-generating tools that can transform textual or graphical descriptions of interactions into scripts interpreted by the game engine. However, in event-based games, this code generation process may lead to potential inefficiencies and conflicts if there are multiple independent sources generating scripts for the same event. This thesis presents solutions to both perils: transformations to eliminate redundancies in the generated scripts and an advisory tool to provide assistance in detecting unintended conflicts. By incorporating traditional compiler techniques with an original code-redundancy-elimination approach, the code transformation is able to reduce code size by 25% on scripts and 14% on compiled byte-codes. With the proposed alternative view, the advisory tool is suitable for offering aid to expose potential script conflicts.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2011-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R34Q70
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Master's
  • Department
    • Department of Computing Science
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Szafron, Duane (Computing Science)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Amaral, Jose Nelson (Computing Science)
    • Carbonaro, Michael (Educational Psychology)