Usage
  • 46 views
  • 154 downloads

Arsenic Speciation Analysis in Environmental and Biological Systems

  • Author / Creator
    Chen, Lydia WL
  • My thesis research focused on the development and application of analytical methods that enabled arsenic speciation in biological and environmental samples. A set of complementary chromatographic separation techniques were combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and hydride generation. These techniques allowed for the separation and detection of arsenobetaine, arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid. The application of these techniques to the determination of arsenic species in human urine has contributed to arsenic exposure measurement in a collaborative pilot epidemiological study. The application of a high performance liquid chromatography – inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique showed that most of the groundwater samples from the Battersea Drain watershed located in southern Alberta had arsenic concentrations below the Canadian drinking water guideline value of 10 µg L-1. A set of complementary chromatographic separation techniques coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was developed to characterize a new arsenic species, Arsenicin A, previously reported for the presence in a marine sponge. These techniques enabled the separation and detection of an Arsenicin A model compound, arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenobetaine, and an arsenosugar. The application of these techniques to the determination of arsenic species in marine sponges suggested that arsenic speciation profile may be organism and habitat dependent. A comparative cellular uptake study that used human lung carcinoma A549 cells showed that these cells were able to uptake two orders of magnitude more Arsenicin A model compound than arsenite. The higher cellular uptake of Arsenicin A model compound was consistent with the higher toxicity of Arsenicin A model compound as compared to arsenite, suggesting that the cellular uptake is an important factor contributing to the toxicity of these arsenic species. My Ph.D. research has provided analytical techniques that are useful to environmental and biological studies.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2013-06
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Doctor of Philosophy
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3P55DR10
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Doctoral
  • Department
    • Department of Chemistry
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Le, X. Chris
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Loppnow, Glen (Chemistry)
    • Weinfeld, Michael (Oncology)
    • Harynuk, James (Chemistry)
    • Wang, Feiyue (Chemistry)