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KIWEYTOTAHK ISKWEW ISKOTAYOW: Returning to the Women Fire

  • Author / Creator
    Louis, Claudine C.
  • The literature available on First Nations women from a Euro-Western Canadian perspective has painted a bleak, shortsighted, narrow image of the Native woman. Euro-Western societal structures acknowledge that the Aboriginal woman is at the bottom of the socio-economic pyramid, and such structural and societal imbalances continue to marginalize the Aboriginal woman in Canada. In contrast, Indigenous ontological and epistemological systems recognize the Aboriginal woman as being next to the Creator, in a position of reverence and respect. Hence, the Euro-Western and the Aboriginal views of womanhood clash with one another. This research study introduces the Omisimaw Leadership Model as one approach to investigating that clash, and to seeking ways through which that model can be used as a tool in the healing of Aboriginal communities. Returning to the Women Fire describes processes of personal transformation through engagement with Indigenous Research Methodologies, and it provides the reader with an understanding of how ancient Indigenous knowledge structures, like the Omisimaw Leadership Model, continue to prevail and help Aboriginal women in personal and community healing, wellness and transformation.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    2014-11
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Doctor of Philosophy
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3445HK1P
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
  • Language
    English
  • Institution
    University of Alberta
  • Degree level
    Doctoral
  • Department
    • Department of Educational Policy Studies
  • Specialization
    • Indigenous Peoples Education
  • Supervisor / co-supervisor and their department(s)
    • Dr. Cora Weber-Pillwax (Educational Policy Studies)
  • Examining committee members and their departments
    • Dr.Lorna Williams (Faculty of Education, University of Victoria)
    • Dr. Lynette Shultz (Educational Policy Studies)
    • Dr. Evelyn Steinhauer (Educational Policy Studies)
    • Dr. Brenda Spencer (Faculty of Education, University of Calgary)
    • Dr. Priscilla Settee (Dept. of Native Studies, University of Saskatchewan)