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Bridging the Cultural Divide: Intercultural New Play Dramaturgy in Toronto

  • Author / Creator
    LaCroix, Elise
  • This is a study of the role of the dramaturg in intercultural dramaturgy relationships, with a specific focus on dramaturgs practicing, or with experience practicing, in the multicultural city of Toronto. Through analysis of interviews I conducted with six dramaturgs in the summer of 2017, I investigate the dramaturg as space-maker in Toronto’s theatre community, drawing on Ric Knowles’ extensive analysis of the intercultural performance ecology of the city. I interrogate commonly held assumptions about the invisibility and expertise of the dramaturg, applying Jacqueline Lo and Helen Gilbert’s model for interculturalism, as well as Donna Haraway’s articulation of situated knowledges, to understand the mutually transformative dynamics and the processes of forging trust in dramaturgy relationships. Further, I examine the various relationships the dramaturg has to their own identity, drawing on previous investigation of the dramaturg working in intercultural contexts by Mayte Gómez, and recent research into Indigenous dramaturgies by Lindsay Lachance, and argue for the importance of self-reflexivity and articulation by the dramaturg to create productive intercultural dramaturgy relationships.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Fall 2018
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Arts
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/R3DF6KK3F
  • License
    Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.