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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R38C9RC50

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Entombed Little Ice Age Bryophytes: Ecology and Regeneration Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
regeneration
little ice age
bryophytes
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Williams, Krista H.
Supervisor and department
La Farge, Catherine (Biological Sciences)
Hik, David (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Hik, David (Biological Sciences)
La Farge, Catherine (Biological Sciences)
Douglas, Marianne (Earth and Atmosphere Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2013-06-18T13:06:36Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Subglacial bryophytes, entombed during the Little Ice Age (LIA, 150-580 years BP) beneath the polythermal Teardrop Glacier, Sverdrup Pass, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada, were examined. The diversity, paleoecological significance, and regeneration capacity of these bryophyte assemblages are the focus of this study. A comparison of LIA and extant assemblages from the granitic, southern slope of Sverdrup Pass, form the basis of Chapter II. The results suggest that species richness and diversity are similar in bryophyte assemblages of pre and post LIA glacier expansion and retreat and indicate diverse microhabitats. Chapter III examines the regeneration of bryophytes from a subglacial ecosystem and indicates viable tissue resumed growth after fragmentation in vitro. In contrast to vascular plants, bryophytes are poikilohydric, and desiccation and freezing tolerant and their tissue (stems, leaves, diaspores) consists of totipotent cells, which facilitates dormancy in subglacial ecosystems.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R38C9RC50
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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