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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3KW50

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Evaluating terrestrial-aquatic linkages in the Canadian Rocky Mountains: Eiffel Lake and Sentinel Lake, Banff National Park Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
productivity
treeline
pollen
paleolimnology
deterioration
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Tirlea, Diana
Supervisor and department
Beaudoin, Alwynne B. (Royal Alberta Museum)
Vinebrooke, Rolf D. (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Currah, Randolph S. (Biological Sciences)
Douglas, Marianne (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-01-31T16:41:56Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study examined if nutrient loading of phosphorus-rich pollen into small mountain lakes has a significant impact on lake productivity. Increased pollen input into lakes due to changes in vegetation (e.g., timberline advance) may increase lake production. Deteriorated pollen was recorded for frozen and freeze-dried sediment samples to determine if storage method effects pollen preservation. There were no strong relationships between pollen accumulation rates (PAR) and pigment concentrations for Sentinel Lake and Eiffel Lake. A lagged response of pigment concentrations to increased PAR was illustrated for Eiffel. Examination of pollen ratios and stomata suggests recent timberline advance for Eiffel, but pollen ratios were a poor indicator of timberline for Sentinel. Sediment storage methods did not play a significant role in differential preservation of pollen grains. Further investigation of the potential effect of PAR on lake productivity is required because timberline advance may alter lake productivity through increased pollen input.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3KW50
Rights
License granted by Diana Tirlea (dtirlea@ualberta.ca) on 2011-01-28T19:06:07Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File size: 34167218
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File title: Microsoft Word - Thesis_Jan_25FIN_2011.doc
File author: Diana Tirlea
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