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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HM52Q96

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Are Low- or High-Effort Self-Control Strategies More Motivating? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
self-control
anticipated effort
feasibility focus
self-control strategy
desirability focus
motivation
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Tian, Ding
Supervisor and department
Häubl, Gerald (Marketing)
Examining committee member and department
Pracejus, John (Marketing)
Argo, Jennifer (Marketing)
Fishbach, Ayelet (Booth School of Business, University of Chicago)
Moore, Sarah (Marketing)
Murray, Kyle (Marketing)
Department
Faculty of Business
Specialization
Marketing
Date accepted
2015-07-09T14:26:04Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Consumers often must employ self-control strategies to resist temptations in order to achieve their self-control goals. Although prior work has identified many useful self-control strategies, it remains unclear when and how the anticipated amount of effort required to implement a specific strategy affects subsequent motivation to exercise self-control. In this dissertation, I aim to extend prior literature by examining when the anticipated amount of effort (low vs. high) required by a self-control strategy facilitates (vs. undermines) subsequent self-control. I hypothesize that the effect of anticipated effort to be expended in the use of a strategy on self-control is moderated by whether desirability or feasibility concerns are more salient. Across different self-control domains (saving money, maintaining physical health, being persistent, and overcoming procrastination), six experiments provide converging evidence that anticipated effort associated with using a self-control strategy has a direct negative effect on self-control under a feasibility focus, whereas it has an indirect positive effect on self-control under a desirability focus via an increase in the perceived importance of the associated self-control goal. Furthermore, results show that this effect is independent of the actual use of the strategy. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HM52Q96
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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