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The effects of a volitional breathing technique on swallowing and respiratory coordination in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A pilot investigation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
dysphagia
swallow-respiration coordination
lung volume
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Bohaichuk, Amanda R
Supervisor and department
Hopper, Tammy (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
Cleary, Stuart (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
Examining committee member and department
Kalra, Sanjay (Medicine)
Department
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-01-04T11:55:57Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) often present with aberrant respiratory-swallowing relationships. In this pilot study, eight individuals with ALS learned a volitional breathing technique designed to promote safe swallowing. The primary focus of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique in (1) promoting expiratory breathing after swallowing and (2) improving patients’ perceptions of swallowing. As a group, the participants showed a statistically significant increase in the average number of typical swallows (expiration after swallowing) following training. With regard to perceptions of swallowing, there were no obvious differences between participants’ baseline and post-treatment quality of the life scores on a questionnaire; however, participants’ responses to qualitative interview questions were generally positive and suggest that participants found the treatment technique to be beneficial and effective in improving their safety and comfort while swallowing.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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