ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Role of Caregiver Beliefs About Alzheimer Disease in the Social Creation of Dependency Among Persons With Alzheimer DiseaseDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3BQ6G

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Role of Caregiver Beliefs About Alzheimer Disease in the Social Creation of Dependency Among Persons With Alzheimer Disease Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Patronising
Dementia
Caregiver
Age
Aging
Alzheimer
Independence
Elderspeak
Dependent
Attitudes
independent
Dependency
Stereotypes
Caregiving
Beliefs
Alzheimer's
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rust, Tiana, B
Supervisor and department
Kwong See, Sheree (Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Orange, JB (University of Western Ontatio)
Dixon, Roger (Psychology)
Hopper, Tammy (Speech Language Pathology)
Bisanz, Jeff (Psychology)
Liu, Lili (Rehabilitation Medicine)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-08-13T14:43:27Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
It is estimated that over 1.1 million people in Canada will have dementia by 2038 (Alzheimer Society of Canada, 2010). In the caregiving context it is important that independence be maintained for as long as possible. Previous research has shown that caregivers can inadvertently create excess dependency (Baltes, Burgess, & Stewart, 1980) and use talk that is patronizing when their interactions with nursing home residents are guided by age-stereotypical beliefs. Social creation of dependency has not been studied in the care of persons with Alzheimer disease (AD). This study (a) assessed professional caregivers’ attitudes toward aging using the Implicit Association Test and beliefs about aging and AD in the social, physical, and cognitive domains using the Beliefs about Aging and AD questionnaire (B-AD; Rust & Kwong See, 2010); (b) observed interactions between caregivers and persons with AD to find evidence for the social creation of dependency and patronizing speech; (c) explored the relationship between attitudes and beliefs and caregiver behaviours; and (d) using semistructured interviews, additionally probed caregivers’ beliefs about AD, views on caregiving, and communication with persons with AD. Caregiver attitudes toward aging were negative. Caregivers’ beliefs about AD were found to be the most negative in the cognitive domain, less negative in the social domain, and the least negative in the physical domain. The observational data showed that residents’ dependent behaviour secured caregivers’ dependence-supportive behaviour, the dominant script that has been found among cognitively intact older adults and their caregivers (Baltes et al., 1980), and that caregivers displayed some aspects of patronizing speech in their interactions with residents. Associating AD with increased risk of injury and resistance to help is related to the dependence-support script. Caregivers’ beliefs about poor long-term memory and resistance to help are related to greater use of patronizing speech. In the semistructured interviews caregivers’ strategies to communicate effectively with residents with AD did not always coincide with what experimental evidence suggests is effective. Three themes emerged with regard to caregivers’ goals for interactions with residents: ensuring that residents have a good day, showing residents respect, and promoting residents’ independence. The implications of the study results for caregiver training to maintain independence are discussed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3BQ6G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T02:48:38.989+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1929971
Last modified: 2015:10:12 16:40:17-06:00
Filename: Rust_Tiana_Fall 2012.pdf
Original checksum: 66918cea38037d6ef33fb1fd2158c32d
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Master's Thesis/Dissertation
File author: Tiana Rust
Page count: 206
File language: en-CA
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date