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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3S97R

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Discrimination of musical intervals by humans and chickadees: Cue salience modulated by timbre Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Operant
Black-capped Chickadee
Discrimination
Music cognition
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Vilinsky, Lee M
Supervisor and department
Sturdy, Christopher (Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Treit, Dallas (Psychology)
Paszkowski, Cynthia (Biology)
Hurd, Peter (Psychology)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-09-10T14:54:32Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Musical consonance/dissonance, roughly defined by its characteristic stability/instability, has been shown to be a relatively salient feature of sound. The extent to which the salience of this property varies as a function of timbre, a property that distinguishes two sounds of the same pitch and loudness, is currently unknown. A Go/No Go operant task was employed to test how humans (Experiment 1) and black-capped chickadees (Experiment 2) discriminate synthetic and piano musical intervals of varying consonance/dissonance. Humans that discriminated synthetic intervals had proportionally higher error rates for intervals where the upper notes were close in pitch whereas humans that discriminated piano stimuli had more errors to stimuli related by consonance. Chickadees showed a similar trend for synthetic intervals but not for piano intervals. Taken together, these findings suggest that timbre modulates the salience of consonance/dissonance for auditory discrimination tasks but that the relative salience varies across species.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3S97R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File author: Lee Vilinsky
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File language: en-CA
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