ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Giant quartz vein zones of the Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, CanadaDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3BW8Z

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Giant quartz vein zones of the Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, Canada Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
oxygen isotopes
giant quartz vein zones
Great Bear Magmatic Zone
Northwest Territories
fluid inclusions
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Byron, Suzanne
Supervisor and department
Gleeson, Sarah A. (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Richards, Jeremy P. (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Etsell, Thomas H. (Chemical and Materials Engineering)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-29T14:59:57Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, hosts numerous giant quartz veins and stockwork zones. These zones can be up to 100m wide and up to 10km long, with two or more generations of quartz. A few of the giant quartz vein zones host base-metal ± uranium mineralization, and some are proximal to mineralization, although most are barren. Cathodoluminescence imaging shows the quartz veins have complex growth zones and a trace element study suggests that these zones are the result of Al and Li substitution in the quartz lattice. Oxygen isotope (δ18Oqtz) values of quartz generally fall between +8 to +14.6‰ (VSMOW). Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures range from 100 to 375˚C, and the fluids have variable salinities. The fluids that created the giant quartz veins are epithermal in nature with a meteoric water ± brine signature, and formed as a result of multiple fluid pulses and re-fracturing events.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3BW8Z
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T15:06:35.655+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 46596078
Last modified: 2015:10:12 10:31:04-06:00
Filename: Byron_Suzanne_Fall2010.pdf
Original checksum: 0088d1a9d474249647a2839a3104db09
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Page count: 146
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date