ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Gendering Compassion: Women and the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to AnimalsDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30T04

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Gendering Compassion: Women and the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
animal cruelty
RSPCA
animal welfare
gender
SPCA
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Elves, Erika A
Supervisor and department
Samson, Jane (History and Classics)
Examining committee member and department
Heath, Deana (History and Classics)
Samson, Jane (History and Classics)
Hamilton, Susan (English and Film Studies)
Department
Department of History and Classics
Specialization
History
Date accepted
2013-03-28T09:02:15Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
British women significantly impacted the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) during its formative period, 1824-1850. Through the adoption and imaginative use of the female gender norms of nineteenth century British society, philanthropic women influenced their society through compassionate volunteerism. The women who worked with the RSPCA used their personal influence within their families, their social circles, and society at large to promote animal welfare. They attended meetings. They participated in educational initiatives, such as the creation and distribution of tracts and pamphlets. These women both sought out and donated funds, adding significant sums to the Society's coffers. They witnessed and reported animal cruelty and then testified in court. Although they were initially not welcomed onto the formal Committee, they were the driving force behind the development of auxiliary societies in other areas of England and Ireland. Women were vital to the development of the RSPCA.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30T04
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T00:10:29.868+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 454069
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:58:30-06:00
Filename: Elves_Erika_Spring 2013.pdf
Original checksum: 488e6d7a68c548b29e7ae44b210f136f
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Unexpected error in findFonts java.lang.ClassCastException: edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfSimpleObject cannot be cast to edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfDictionary offset=2270
Status message: Invalid Annotation list offset=402125
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date