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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3222RJ1P

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Northern Coast Salish Marine Resource Management Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Fish Trap
Northern Coast Salish
Clam Garden
Marine Resource Management
Archaeology
Intertidal Management Feature
Traditional Ecological Knowledge
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Caldwell, Megan Elizabeth
Supervisor and department
Lepofsky, Dana (Archaeology, Simon Fraser University)
Losey, Robert (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Blake, Michael (Anthropology, University of British Columbia)
Willoughby, Pamela (Anthropology)
Haagsma, Margriet (History & Classics)
Ives, Jack (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-08-13T10:37:47Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
This dissertation explores the traditional marine management systems of the Northern Coast Salish in British Columbia, Canada. Combining traditional knowledge with archaeological data, this dissertation seeks to understand the long-term history of ancestral Northern Coast Salish marine resource use and management. The substantive chapters present, respectively: a review of traditional marine management systems of the Northwest Coast; a typology of intertidal marine management features in Northern Coast Salish territory; and, an evaluation of ancestral Northern Coast Salish marine resource management by integrating data from intertidal features and zooarchaeological remains using a series of nested analytical scales. Overall, this dissertation shows that the ancestral Northern Coast Salish had an expansive, integrated system of marine management that allowed for sustained use of a key suite of taxa over several millennia.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3222RJ1P
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Lepofsky, D. and M. Caldwell. 2013. Indigenous marine resource management on the Northwest Coast of North America. Ecological Processes 2:12.Caldwell, M.E., D. Lepofsky, G. Combes, M. Washington, J.R. Welch and J.R. Harper. 2012. A Bird’s Eye View of Northern Coast Salish Intertidal Resource Management Features, Southern British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 7(2): 219-233.Caldwell, M. (2014) Appendix E: Intertidal Subsistence Features. In C. Springer, M. Caldwell, N. Chalmer, J. Jackley, and D. Lepofsky (2014) Final Report on Archaeological Investigations (2009-0132) by the Simon Fraser University – Tla’amin First Nation Archaeology and Heritage Stewardship Project, Powell River Regional District, British Columbia. Report on file at the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Victoria, British Columbia, pp. 605-671.

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