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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R32N4ZP5H

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At-promise Students: a study of urban student learning in Alberta within the context of science education Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
marginalized
scientism
science education
urban education
postcolonialism
hybridity
at-promise
liminal space
constructivist grounded theory
s/place
hope
empowerment
critical pedagogy
curriculum
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Chahal, Monica M
Supervisor and department
Richardson, George (Secondary Education)
Examining committee member and department
Kim, Mijung (Elementary Education)
Johnston, Ingrid (Secondary Education)
Richardson, George (Secondary Education)
Pegg, Jerine (Elementary Education)
Blades, David (Science Education & Curriculum Studies, University of Victoria)
Department
Department of Secondary Education
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-12-24T10:41:36Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
As teachers and educators, we have power, be it destructive or supportive. As such, we have a duty to our students to understand their complexities. The purpose of my research which utilizes a Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology by means of a case study approach in the context of science education is not aimed at an improvement of performance, but rather hopes to provide a situational and contextual understanding of learning. Urban youth live a life in flux, in almost constant change. A place of learning needs to acknowledge this fluctuation, as place is merely the backdrop for the potential for relationship-building and, thus, learning. The breakthroughs that occurred as a result of this research were not because of the location in which the learning took place, but because an opportunity was presented to nurture the space for relationships within the places – a concept I have coined as‘s/place.’ Within the place of school, spaces exist for relationship-building and the creation of hybrid identities in which students’ multiple selves are acknowledged and thus s/place becomes the confluence of space and place. I conducted my research in an urban setting because students who live, study and work in urban environments are often overlooked. Their brilliance is dulled through a consistent grinding down of who they are and by being told that what they know is not valued. My hope is that my work demonstrates that change is not only possible but achievable if we are open to listening to the voices of the unheard and often overlooked youth in our classrooms.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R32N4ZP5H
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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