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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3S123

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Balance mechanisms during standing and walking in young and older adults Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Older Adults
Walking
Balance
Standing
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lee, Sungeun
Supervisor and department
Misiaszek, John (Occupational Therapy)
Examining committee member and department
Camicioli, Richard (Neurology)
Yang, Jaynie (Physical Therapy)
Department
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-28T21:27:39Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Maintaining balance is controlled by two different processes: feedforward and feedback control. Feed-forward control is used prior to performing voluntary movements whereas feedback control is used to correct for unexpected perturbations. Studies suggested that age-related changes in postural responses may contribute to increased risk of falls in older adults. To address whether Tai Chi training can induce improved patterns of feed-forward control, voluntary arm elevations during standing were performed. Compared to age-matched controls, smaller displacements of the center of pressure were found among older adults who practice Tai Chi. This may suggest adapted feed-forward control induced by training. To investigate feedback control, perturbations were applied while walking with various arm constraints. Context-dependent modulation in response amplitude was found with changing levels of postural threat in older adults, comparable to young adults. Delayed onset latencies and frequent inhibition of Soleus may suggest less effective balance strategies employed in older adults, and an increased risk of falling.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3S123
Rights
License granted by Sungeun Lee (sungeun@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-28T15:36:18Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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