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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33D8Z

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Distracting the imagination: does visuospatial or auditory interference influence gesture and speech during narrative production? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
iconic gestures
visuospatial working memory
embodied cognition
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Smithson, Lisa
Supervisor and department
Dr. Elena Nicoladis (Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Sandra Wiebe (Psychology)
Dr. Jeremy Caplan (Psychology)
Dr. Paula Marentette (Psycholinguistics)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-20T21:49:21Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The relationship between imagery, iconic gesture production, and speech was assessed among 120 participants in a narrative task. Study 1 indicated no significant relationship between visuospatial working memory capacity and iconic gesture production, and demonstrated that when visual interference is eliminated, iconic gesture rate decreases. Study 2 provided evidence that as visual interference increases in difficulty, participants use iconic gestures to a greater extent. Study 3 provided suggestive evidence that as auditory interference increases in difficulty, participants use iconic gestures to a greater extent. With respect to speech production, strong associations between narrative length and iconic gesture production were demonstrated in every condition except for when visual perceptual interference was eliminated. These results were interpreted within a framework of embodied cognition wherein iconic gesture production and imagery interact bi-directionally to facilitate the activation of imagistic representations and speech production.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33D8Z
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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