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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3S02R

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Individual differences in emotion regulation and their impact on selective attention Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
emotion regulation
personality
selective attention
individual differences
emotion
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Arndt, Jody
Supervisor and department
Fujiwara, Esther (Psychiatry)
Examining committee member and department
Joyce, Anthony (Psychiatry)
Schimel, Jeff (Psychology)
Dursun, Serdar (Psychiatry)
Department
Department of Psychiatry
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-05T16:53:44Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Studies were conducted to investigate relationships between trait emotion regulation variables (including reappraisal and suppression) and selective attention to negative emotional information. Correlation analyses of data in experiment 1 showed that trait-suppression was related to early attentional avoidance of angry faces, while reappraisal showed no relationship to attention. Experiment 2 directly compared selective attention to angry faces in groups of high trait-suppressors and high trait-reappraisers. Since reappraisers are also low trait-anxious and suppressors are high trait-anxious, low emotion regulating high- and low-anxious control groups were included. Contrary to findings from experiment 1, trait-suppressors did not have lower selective attention to angry faces than low-regulating high anxious controls. Trait-reappraisers in experiment 2 showed pronounced vigilance for angry faces compared to both trait suppressors and low-regulating low anxious controls. These results suggest that trait-suppression may reduce attentional threat biases. Conversely, trait-reappraisal combined with low anxiety may allow individuals to prioritize threat in attention.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3S02R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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