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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31R6N80G

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Waking Ned Devine: une traduction franco acadienne pour locuteurs acadiens, franco-canadiens, et francophones d’ailleurs et partout Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Acadie
dubbing
France
audiovisual translation
Translation Issues
Ireland
Quebec
Waking Ned Devine
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
LeBlanc, Amélie F
Supervisor and department
Malena, Anne (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Malena, Anne (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Penrod, Lynn (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Stewart, Selina (History & Classics)
Reyns, Christian (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Department
Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies
Specialization
Translation Studies
Date accepted
2015-07-10T09:20:56Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The following study aimed to show the need for Franco-Canadian dubbings outside of France, and so as to elaborate the existing issues in audiovisual translation, the film Waking Ned Devine (2001) was translated into Acadian French (with Chiac components). The main goal of this study was to demonstrate that the universal French language used in French and Quebec dubbings is insufficient and often misunderstood by a vast majority of Franco-Canadian publics and Acadian publics in particular. The project thus includes an analysis of Ireland and Acadie’s sociocultural and sociolinguistic contexts as well as a portion of the translated film script written by Kirk Jones (1999). The translation was completed with the idea that a dubbing could eventually be produced with Acadian actors. During the research for this present memoir, a certain paradox became quite obvious: cinematographic production companies require that dubbings be made into standardized French, as much in France as in Quebec, and specifically ask that all forms of dialects and regionalisms be avoided. The result; most French dubbings are rigid, and almost artificial even, since Francophone publics do not speak this same neutral French which seems to come out of nowhere. This means, and is also due to a law put in place in France to protect French audiovisual translation rights, that a tremendously large number of American or Foreign films are dubbed twice into two standardized versions of French (in France and in Quebec) which are nearly identical and quite often despised by their targeted audiences.
Language
French
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31R6N80G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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