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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3PQ56

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Lexical tone processing by monolingual and bilingual speakers of tone and non-tone languages Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
bilingualism
speech perception
phonological acquisition
language development
lexical tone
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Danielson, Donald Kyle
Supervisor and department
Tucker, Benjamin (Linguistics)
Examining committee member and department
Paradis, Johanne (Linguistics)
Tucker, Benjamin (Linguistics)
Nicoladis, Elena (Psychology)
Department
Department of Linguistics
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-07-05T15:15:56Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This study tests early Chinese-English bilinguals’ perception of Thai lexical tone. Lexical tone is a feature that is used contrastively in Chinese but not in English. Chinese-learning infants exhibit native-like treatment of Thai tonal contours, while English learners exhibit non-native perceptual behaviour (Mattock & Burnham, 2006). However, early Chinese-English bilingual adults in the present study do not perform differently on the task than do monolingual English speakers with no tone language experience. Late Chinese-English bilinguals perform more accurately than both of the other groups. Early bilinguals do exhibit evidence of Chinese language experience, as their within-task processing strategies more closely resemble those of late bilingual speakers than those of English monolinguals. Developmental and biographical explanations for the behaviour of the early bilinguals are explored through the use of a language proficiency questionnaire, and the role of bilingual dominance is analyzed in relation to performance on this task.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3PQ56
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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