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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3T33G

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Mechanisms of Recovery in Acquired Alexia Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Alexia
Stroke
Reading Treatment
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lemke, Shannon F
Supervisor and department
Kim, Esther (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
Examining committee member and department
Hopper, Tammy (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
Bolger, Patrick (Linguistics)
Kim, Esther (Speech Pathology and Audiology)
Department
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-08-16T09:33:29Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Reading impairment, known as alexia, frequently co-occurs with damage to the language areas of the brain in aphasia. Text-based reading treatments have been shown to improve reading fluency, but the mechanisms behind such improvement remain unclear. This study investigates the efficacy of Multiple Oral Rereading and Oral Reading for Language in Aphasia as a combined treatment for an individual with surface alexia, and examines whether eye-movements change as a result of treatment. Following treatment, reading rate and accuracy significantly improved on practiced passages, and improved reading rate generalized to novel passages. Generalization was also observed on a measure of spoken/written language. Eye-movements (number of fixations, regressions, and fixation durations) differed from pre-treatment to post-treatment and follow-up, although in the opposite direction of what was expected. Initial fixation position shifted towards that of more proficient readers after the completion of treatment, suggesting treatment resulted in a change in reading strategy.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3T33G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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