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Recently Uploaded (last two weeks)

Title:
Copyright that encourages learning: Subject to a "customary price" or within copyright's "breathing space"?
Description:
Presented at the closing panel of Fair Dealing Week 2017 events hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Graham, Rumi
Title:
Fair Dealing Week 2017 poster
Description:
Poster prepared for Fair Dealing Week 2017 events hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Wakaruk, Amanda
Title:
Economic Impacts of the Canadian Educational Sector’s Fair Dealing Guidelines
Description:
Presentation made during the opening panel of Fair Dealing Week 2017, hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Cameron, Linda
Title:
Update on Fair Dealing Law and Advocacy in Canada
Description:
Presentation made during the opening panel of Fair Dealing Week 2017 events hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Knopf, Howard
Title:
Six Factors if Necessary But Not Necessarily Six Factors
Description:
Presentation made during closing panel of Fair Dealing Week 2017 events hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Nair, Meera
Title:
Where do we go from here? Exploring the boundaries of fair dealing.
Description:
Moderator's presentation delivered as part of the closing panel for Fair Dealing Week 2017 events hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Wakaruk, Amanda
Title:
Fair Dealing
Description:
Presentation made during the opening panel of Fair Dealing Week 2017 events hosted by the University of Alberta Copyright Office.
Author/Creators:
Hutchison, Cameron
Title:
Forms of Capital as Facilitators of Internationally Educated Nurses’ Integration into the Registered Nursing Workforce in Canada
Description:
We used interview data to explore internationally educated nurses’ perceptions of the factors that facilitated their integration into the registered nursing workforce in Canada. The participants perceived that a variety of interrelated factors facilitated their integration. The identified factors seem to reflect forms of capital. Economic capital (availability of financial resources) and cultural capital (language proficiency and competency in professional vocabulary) enabled the participants to use other forms of capital to become registered and employed in Canada. Providing financial resources and interventions to develop their language skills may assist internationally educated nurses with more rapidly integrating into the country’s nursing workforce.
Author/Creators:
Covell, Christine L.
Title:
Simultaneous temporal trends in dementia incidence and prevalence, 2005–2013: A population-based retrospective cohort study in Saskatchewan, Canada
Description:
Background: Original studies published over the last decade regarding time trends in dementia report mixed results. The aims of the present study were to use linked administrative health data for the province of Saskatchewan for the period 2005/2006 to 2012/2013 to: (1) examine simultaneous temporal trends in annual age- and sex-specific dementia incidence and prevalence among individuals aged 45 and older, and (2) stratify the changes in incidence over time by database of identification. Methods: Using a population-based retrospective cohort study design, data were extracted from seven provincial administrative health databases linked by a unique anonymized identification number. Individuals 45 years and older at first identification of dementia between April 1, 2005 and March 31, 2013 were included, based on case definition criteria met within any one of four administrative health databases (hospital, physician, prescription drug, and long-term care). Results: Between 2005/2006 and 2012/2013, the 12-month age-standardized incidence rate of dementia declined significantly by 11.07% and the 12-month age-standardized prevalence increased significantly by 30.54%. The number of incident cases decreased from 3,389 to 3,270 and the number of prevalent cases increased from 8,795 to 13,012. Incidence rate reductions were observed in every database of identification. Conclusions: We observed a simultaneous trend of decreasing incidence and increasing prevalence of dementia over a relatively short 8-year time period from 2005/2006 to 2012/2013. These trends indicate that the average survival time of dementia is lengthening. Continued observation of these time trends is warranted given the short study period.
Author/Creators:
Kosteniuk, J. G.
Title:
Fruit and vegetable stand on a street in St. Petersburg Russia
Description:
This semi-permanent open-air fruit and vegetable stand was on a street in St. Petersburg, Russia in September, 2016. In addition to several types of melons, the vendor had corn, grapes and figs for sale.
Author/Creators:
Campbell, Sandy
Title:
Fruit stand in St. Petersburg, Russia
Description:
This fruit stand was on a street in St. Petersburg, Russia in September, 2016.
Author/Creators:
Campbell, Sandy
Title:
Street cleaning truck on a street in St. Petersburg, Russia
Description:
This tank truck with a front-mounted blade was the third in a convoy of street cleaning equipment traveling on a street in St. Petersburg, Russia in September, 2016.
Author/Creators:
Campbell, Sandy
Title:
Road sweeper on the street in St. Petersburg, Russia
Description:
This street sweeper was the second of three implements traveling on a street in St. Petersburg, Russia in September 2016.
Author/Creators:
Campbell, Sandy
Title:
Tractor on the street in St. Petersburg, Russia
Description:
This tractor, with a front mounted blade and a rear-mounted sweeper brush was the first of three road maintenance vehicles traveling on a street in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Author/Creators:
Campbell, Sandy
Title:
Omics-based bioactive and drug discovery in Bacillus spp.
Description:
Several strains of Bacillus spp. were isolated from across Algeria, the largest African country. The strains were bioprospected from several economically-relevant environments such as oil-mining sites, salty lakes, coal mines, deserts and oil-contaminated water basins. Hundreds of isolates were extensively screened for extracellular enzyme and lipid-emulsifying properties and pathogen-inhibition activities. Potent strains were further subjected to both genomics and proteomics-metabolomics based-pipelines for gene-cluster and bioactive peptide discovery, respectively. Whole genome shotgun sequencing revealed new strains of Bacillus spp. namely: the insecticidal B. thuringensis; the biosurfactant-producing B. amyloliquefaciens; the bacteriocin-producing B. paralicheniformis; the food borne-pathogen B. cereus and the soil-borne pathogen B. anthacis. Cluster gene analyses revealed an extensive repertoire of secondary metabolite families encoded in the genome of these new Bacillus strains such as bacteriocins, terpenes, lassopeptides, lipopeptides, homoserine lactones, and siderophores. These bioinformatically predicted gene inventories were coupled with metabolomics platforms to confirm a number of biotechnologically relevant molecules. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) identified several potent bioactives such as fengycins, lantipeptides and microcins with strong bactericidal activity against common food borne-pathogens such as E. coli, Salmonella and S. aureus. Here, we will present the direct biotechnological application of genomics and targeted metabolomics in microbial bioactive predictions and drug discovery.
Author/Creators:
Albert Remus Rosana
Title:
Between Censorship and Reconciliation
Description:
In my presentation I explore the grey area between censorship in terms of banning books, and reconciliation.  I will be using the children’s novel The King’s Daughter by Suzanne Martel as a case study. The King’s Daughter was published in 1981 and is the story of a French orphan who chooses to become a Fille du Roy and is shipped off to New France to help populate the colony.  What follows is a lively, though quite racist romp through the wilderness in what is now southern Quebec.  A decade into its life, the book was challenged and banned in Saskatchewan.  In response, the publisher released a new version, which had been censored without any input from Martel.  Unfortunately, the second edition manages to do the nearly impossible and is more racist than the first.   My presentation will focus primarily on the ways that libraries deal with challenged books, particularly those that lean in a racist sort of direction.  I will draw on documents from various libraries, the American Library Association, the United Nations, the Truth and Reconciliation Committee, and my own feelings on the matter.
Author/Creators:
Bartee, Katie
Title:
Availability of Resources for Religious Practice in Canadian Public Libraries
Description:
Although religious groups make up a significant percentage of the Canadian population, there is a gap in research about whether or not Canadian libraries carry sufficient materials to meet the needs of their religious users. To address this gap, this study examined the number of Christian, Islamic, and Sikh religious resources, which were applicable for religious practice, in Toronto Public Library and Vancouver Public Library. This information was compared to the most current data from Statistics Canada on the number of self-identified Christians, Muslims and, Sikhs living in Toronto and Vancouver. The findings suggest that the amount of religious material currently available for the religious practice of these groups may be inadequate and that this is an issue which requires further investigation.
Author/Creators:
Snihurowych Lynch, Sarah V. W.
Title:
Pokémon Go to the Library!: Assessing Digital Trends at the Library
Description:
This research presents the findings regarding digital trends within libraries, using Pokémon Go as a case study. It aims to add understanding as to why digital trends and keeping up with them are vital to all library systems and also to provide insight into how libraries can adopt future digital trends. A literature analysis is the basis of this study. By analyzing the professional literature surrounding the use of Pokémon Go within libraries, the author will identify the three libraries who are front runners within the field. The author will scan each of the library’s social media pages to discover whether or not they have successfully jumped onto the trend. Findings have illustrated that Public libraries are the frontrunners of Pokémon Go. Most libraries that have documented use of the game tend to come from the United States. This study will not look at every library with great detail. Rather, it will provide a broad analysis of those libraries that are key to the discourse surrounding Pokémon Go within the library. Since the game was initially released in the United States, libraries located there are more likely to be highlighted. It is hoped that this study will inspire libraries to better acquaint themselves with upcoming games and technology before they are released. That way, they can be accurately utilized before the trend has subsided. This is only of the academic study that specifically focuses on library’s involvement with Pokémon Go.
Author/Creators:
Ball, Tanya
Title:
Promoting Literacy with Fanfiction to Young Adults
Description:
Engaging reluctant readers is a common topic among library professionals as the literary lives of young people appear to be changing or declining. Although much research has already been conducted about the nature of reluctant readers, there is little on how to combat it and even less on alternative methods of delivering literacy. The combined use of a literature review and a case study are used to explore fan fiction. The literature review examines fan fiction and its purpose in the literary lives of young people. Case studies of other libraries are key to support the idea of using fanfiction. The literature review explores the viability of fanfiction as a teaching tool to promote reading and writing. It is hoped that this study will inspire the development of a pilot program surrounding the creation and analysis of fanfiction as an alternative method to engage reluctant readers.
Author/Creators:
Walker, Deanna
Title:
​How library staff can help researchers comply with open access mandates
Description:
​This presentation outlines the recent Canadian Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications and what it might mean for academic library staff who will need to become versed on open access (OA) options for researchers. The distinction between “Gold” OA policies and “Green” OA policies is discussed, along with pros and cons of each. Tools that library staff can use to determine the level(s) of open access provided by publishing venues, such as SHERPA/RoMEO, are shown, along with how these tools can be used to help researchers determine the publishing options that will enable them to comply with funders’ OA mandates. The presentation concludes with a discussion on how researchers can self-archive their author manuscripts in institutional repositories - such as the University of Alberta’s Education and Research Archive (ERA) - as an alternative means of meeting OA mandates.
Author/Creators:
Hamilton, Sam
Title:
Wikipedia Edit Assignment
Description:
Through a publishing lens, this paper looks at the edit history of Wikipedia's webpage for the movement, "Black Lives Matter." Keeping in mind the publishing guidelines of Wikipedia, censorship is a key issue. The page's history shows users' varied points of view concerning the movement.
Author/Creators:
Alyssa Woodcox
Title:
Canadian First World War Poetry Monographs, 1914-1918: A Bibliography
Description:
This bibliography collates poetry written about and during the First World War by Canadian poets. Its focus is on monographs - that is, books of poetry - published between 1914 and 1918. It does not include unpublished works or poems published in serial publications; nor does it record the books of poetry published post-war. Its purpose is to provide a resource to researchers interested in the subjects of Canadian poetry and poets, and of the First World War, by facilitating the discovery of the poetry and poets recorded herein. It is the first bibliography written about Canadian First World War poetry. The poets and their poetry recorded in this bibliography were discovered using both online and print sources. Names were drawn from anthologies of First World War poetry and Canadian poetry. Author and subject field searches were conducted in the international online catalogue, WorldCat, and in the University of Alberta’s local online catalogue, NEOS. Results were limited to works published between 1914 and 1918. A total of 98 Canadian poets were discovered to have published 140 monographs between 1914 and 1918 that contain poetry written about the First World War.
Author/Creators:
Hamilton, Sam
Title:
Acoustic characteristics of obstruents in Huehuetla Tepehua
Description:
The Totonacan languages of Mexico are known to make extensive use of glottal stop and laryngealization, but little is known about the phonetic realizations of these contrasts. As part of a larger project investigating laryngealization in Totonacan, this paper presents a description of some acoustic properties of pulmonic and glottalic (or laryngealized) stops and affricates in Huehuetla Tepehua (HT), a Totonacan language spoken in Hidalgo, Mexico. The sound inventory of HT includes a laryngealization contrast in stops at three places of articulation: /p t k p’ t’ k’/, and in affricates at two places of articulation:/ts tʃ ts’ tʃ’/. Closure duration and voice onset time (VOT) were measured for both stops and affricates, as well as relative burst intensity and spectral moments of bursts. Duration, relative intensity, and spectral moments of frication were also measured in affricates. Results show that closure durations are slightly shorter in laryngealized segments than in pulmonic segments across both stops and affricates in all places of articulation, although there is still substantial overlap between them. VOT and closure durations vary across places of articulation in the crosslinguistically expected way, with labial segments /p p’/ having shortest VOT and longest closure, velar segments /k k’/ having longest VOT and shortest closure, and alveolar segments /t t’/ falling in between. However, there is a great deal of overlap between durations for all stops across place, manner, and airstream/laryngealization. Affricates are longer than any other segments analyzed here, with /ts ts’/ tending to have slightly longer frication than /tʃ, tʃ’/, but slightly shorter closures. Contrary to many descriptions of glottalic (i.e. ejective) sounds, the bursts of HT laryngealized stops are far weaker than pulmonic stops, sometimes even nonexistent, making a comparison of bursts between pulmonic and laryngealized stops unlikely to be fruitful, if not impossible to complete.
Author/Creators:
Rebekka Puderbaugh
Title:
Moving from perceptual to functional categories in songbirds
Description:
Category perception, as Herrnstein (1990) defined it, is a powerful and pervasive cognitive ability possessed by every species in which it has been adequately tested. We have studied category perception of vocal communication signals in songbirds for over 20 years. Our first studies provided us with an understanding of songbird vocal category production and perception, clarifying perceptual categorization and the underlying mechanisms. More recent work has moved towards understanding functional vocal categories such as sex, dominance, species, and geography. Some of our most recent work has moved into the realm of conceptual knowledge, with studies aimed at understanding birds’ ability to deal with concepts of sameness and danger (i.e., threat level). Here we provide key examples that effectively show the wide range of abilities possessed and used by songbirds.
Author/Creators:
Christopher B. Sturdy
Title:
Current News on Publishing
Description:
This eBook was an assignment created for the Library and Information Studies (LIS) 541 Publishing course. For the thirteen weeks together, we came to class prepared to discuss a publishing news article or source we found related to the publishing topic of the week, which included scholarly publishing, trade book retailing, distribution and discovery, and speciality publishing to name a few. Each chapter in the eBook consists of online sources that I have chosen, in which I summarized the main points or issues and made reflections where appropriate.
Author/Creators:
Nguyen, Tanya
Title:
Respiration and Excurrent Velocity DATA for 5 demosponges - Data associated with: Ludeman, Reidenbach and Leys, JEB 2017 The energetic cost of filtration by demosponges and their behavioural response to ambient currents
Description:
Abstract: Sponges (Porifera) are abundant in most marine and freshwater ecosystems and as suspension feeders they play a crucial role in filtering the water column. Their active pumping enables them to filter up to 900 times their body volume of water per hour, recycling nutrients and coupling a pelagic food supply with benthic communities. Despite the ecological importance of sponge filter feeding, little is known about how sponges control the water flow through their canal system or how much energy it costs to filter the water. Sponges have long been considered textbook examples of animals that use current-induced flow. We provide evidence that suggests that some species of demosponge do not use current-induced flow, rather they respond behaviourally to increased ambient currents by reducing the volume of water filtered. Using a morphometric model of the canal system, we also show that filter feeding may be more energetically costly than previously thought. Measurements of volumetric flow rates and oxygen removal in five species of demosponge show that pumping rates are variable within and between species, with more oxygen consumed the greater the volume filtered. Together these data suggest that sponges have active control over the volume of water they process, which may be an adaptation to reduce the energetic cost of filtration in times of high stress.
Author/Creators:
Sally Leys
Title:
Cost of filtration DATA for 5 demosponges - Data associated with: Ludeman, Reidenbach and Leys - JEB 2017 The energetic cost of filtration by demosponges and their behavioural response to ambient currents
Description:
Abstract: Sponges (Porifera) are abundant in most marine and freshwater ecosystems and as suspension feeders they play a crucial role in filtering the water column. Their active pumping enables them to filter up to 900 times their body volume of water per hour, recycling nutrients and coupling a pelagic food supply with benthic communities. Despite the ecological importance of sponge filter feeding, little is known about how sponges control the water flow through their canal system or how much energy it costs to filter the water. Sponges have long been considered textbook examples of animals that use current-induced flow. We provide evidence that suggests that some species of demosponge do not use current-induced flow, rather they respond behaviourally to increased ambient currents by reducing the volume of water filtered. Using a morphometric model of the canal system, we also show that filter feeding may be more energetically costly than previously thought. Measurements of volumetric flow rates and oxygen removal in five species of demosponge show that pumping rates are variable within and between species, with more oxygen consumed the greater the volume filtered. Together these data suggest that sponges have active control over the volume of water they process, which may be an adaptation to reduce the energetic cost of filtration in times of high stress.
Author/Creators:
Sally Leys
Title:
Chickadee behavioural response to varying threat levels of predator and conspecific calls
Description:
Chickadees produce many vocalizations, including chick-a-dee calls which they use as a mobbing call in the presence of predators. Previous research has shown that chickadees produce more D notes in their mobbing calls in response to high-threat predators compared to low-threat predators, and may perceive predator and corresponding mobbing vocalizations as similar. We presented black-capped chickadees with playback of high- and low-threat predator calls and conspecific mobbing calls, and non-threat heterospecific and reversed mobbing calls, to examine vocal and movement behavioural responses. Chickadees produced more chick-a-dee calls in response to playback of calls produced by a high-threat predator compared to calls produced by a low-threat predator, and to reversed high-threat mobbing calls compared to normal (i.e., non-reversed) highthreat mobbing calls. Chickadees also vocalized more in response to all playback conditions consisting of conspecific mobbing calls compared to a silent baseline period. The number of D notes that the subjects produced was similar to previous findings; chickadees produced approximately one to three D notes per call in response to low-threat mobbing calls, and produced more calls containing four to five D notes in response to high-threat mobbing calls, although this difference in the number of D notes per call was not significant. The difference in chickadees’ production of tseet calls across playback conditions approached significance as chickadees called more in response to conspecific mobbing calls, but not in response to heterospecific calls. General movement activity decreased in response to playback of conspecific-produced vocalizations, but increased in response to heterospecific-produced vocalizations, suggesting that chickadees may mobilize more in response to predator playback in preparation for a “fight or flight” situation. These results also suggest that chickadees may produce more mobbing calls in response to high-threat predator vocalizations as an attempt to initiate mobbing with conspecifics, while they produce fewer mobbing calls in response to a low-threat predator that a chickadee could outmaneuver.
Author/Creators:
Jenna V. Congdon
Title:
Introduction to Creative Commons
Description:
This presentation was created for Humanities Computing 500. It served to introduce the students to the Creative Commons organization, and covered the organization itself, and a brief, relevant history of copyright and the open access movement. The presentation aims to introduce students to Creative Commons licenses, and some of the their uses and users.
Author/Creators:
Brochu, Leah K.
Title:
What it Means to be a Harlequin Book: Text Analysis of Early Harlequin Covers
Description:
The use of computational analysis to visualize and aid in the interpretation of literature and book history is a way of supplementing traditional literary criticism. The application of statistical algorithms on a large scale allows a researcher to derive textual patterns and relationships that could not be determined without the aid of technology. Instead of only examining a small text sample this study will utilize a large corpus published by Harlequin Enterprises during its first ten years of operation, from 1949 to 1959. By examining stylistic changes in publishing language over time this project will be firmly situated as an effective example of a computational, cross-disciplinary approach to the research and analysis of Canadian book history.
Author/Creators:
Laura Gerlitz
Title:
LIS 598 Information Policy - Winter 2017 - Lecture 6 (video)
Description:
This is the sixth lecture from the Winter 2017 offering of LIS 598 Information Policy. This lecture covers Surveillance. The lecture is available as a PowerPoint with audio or video (.wmv) file. All of the underlying files including the audio is available in the .zip file. Note that there is no text transcript for this lecture. Comments and critique on this presentation and any other material for LIS 598 Information Policy – Winter 2017 can be sent to Michael B. McNally at: mmcnally@ualberta.ca
Author/Creators:
McNally, Michael B
Title:
LIS 598 Information Policy - Winter 2017 - Lecture 6
Description:
This is the sixth lecture from the Winter 2017 offering of LIS 598 Information Policy. This lecture covers Surveillance. The lecture is available as a PowerPoint with audio or video (.wmv) file. All of the underlying files including the audio is available in the .zip file. Note that there is no text transcript for this lecture. Comments and critique on this presentation and any other material for LIS 598 Information Policy – Winter 2017 can be sent to Michael B. McNally at: mmcnally@ualberta.ca
Author/Creators:
McNally, Michael B
Title:
LIS 598 Information Policy - Winter 2017 - Lecture 6 - Underlying Files
Description:
This is the sixth lecture from the Winter 2017 offering of LIS 598 Information Policy. This lecture covers Surveillance. The lecture is available as a PowerPoint with audio or video (.wmv) file. All of the underlying files including the audio is available in the .zip file. Note that there is no text transcript for this lecture. Comments and critique on this presentation and any other material for LIS 598 Information Policy – Winter 2017 can be sent to Michael B. McNally at: mmcnally@ualberta.ca
Author/Creators:
McNally, Michael B
Title:
Adaptations, Audiences, and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Description:
This essay examines various adaptations of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams along with the concept of "knowing audiences" and adaptation theory.
Author/Creators:
May, Erin

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