ERA

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Title:
3B1 Parent information needs and experience regarding acute otitis media in children: a systematic review
Description:
Introduction: Acute otitis media (AOM) —inflammation of the middle ear— is the most common pediatric bacterial ear infection, affecting up to 75% of children at some time before age 5 years. Despite the high incidence of AOM in children, it presents diverse challenges to parents who did not have accurate information regarding what causes AOM and its management. Further, a lack of parental knowledge regarding symptom recognition, medications, and prevention and treatment of AOM have been associated with poor health outcomes (middle ear effusion, hearing loss), which emphasizes the need for adequate educational provision for parents. To respond to this paucity of information in Canada and to inform future practices, we sought to synthesize the literature to provide a more comprehensive perspective of parental information needs and experiences relating to AOM management. Method: Four electronic databases were searched and articles were screened according to pre-established inclusion criteria. Articles were included in the review if they were examining parental information needs for AOM, and we used language (English) and date (January 2000 to date) restrictions. Results: Out of 851 articles retrieved, 13 articles met the inclusion criteria. We completed a descriptive (narrative) analysis and identified four potential and common patterns including: parents’ beliefs and knowledge about AOM; parents' attitude and knowledge about AOM treatment; information seeking behaviour; and burden of AOM on family and child quality of life. Discussion: Incorporating parental information needs into health care assessment and educational planning are essential steps toward improving parental competency in AOM management and enhancing health outcomes.
Author/Creators:
Meherali, Salima
Title:
4A2 Keeping up-to-date with information retrieval research: Summarized Research in Information Retrieval for HTA
Description:
Introduction: Increasing numbers of research papers about information retrieval for health technology assessments, systematic reviews and other evidence syntheses are being published. It is time-consuming and demanding for information specialists to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in the field. To help to meet these challenges, the Interest Group on Information Retrieval (IRG) of Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) has created an open-access web resource entitled SuRe Info (http://www.sure-info.org). Description: Information retrieval methods publications are identified by running topic-specific search strategies in selected relevant databases. A structured appraisal is created for all publications fulfilling the SuRe Info inclusion criteria. The key messages from the appraisals are summarized into topic-specific chapters. Outcomes: Fourteen chapters are now available on SuRe Info, with others currently in development. SuRe Info chapters cover two types of categories: 1) general search methods used across all health technologies, such as strategy development and search filters, and 2) methods used when searching for specific aspects of health technologies, such as clinical effectiveness, safety and economic evaluations. References at the end of each chapter are linked to appraisals of included publications. Links to full-text are provided when freely available. Discussion: SuRe Info offers research-based advice for everyday searching issues. With updates every six months, SuRe Info seeks to help information specialists stay current in the latest developments in the field. It provides easy access to summaries of current methods papers and supports timely uptake of potential new efficiencies in information retrieval practice.
Author/Creators:
Kaunelis, David
Title:
4B2 Colour Our Collections: Using adult colouring as outreach in a health sciences library rare books collection
Description:
Introduction: A simple, cost effective method for engaging students and promoting use of our health sciences library's rare books collection was sought. An environmental scan of other special collections libraries' programs resulted in our decision to capitalize on the adult colouring trend. Description: Colouring pages were created by a practicum student, who digitally traced images from special collection books using an Intuos tablet and MyPaint. These colouring pages were released both in the library and online. In the library, a reproduction of the original document was posted above a table containing copies of the colouring pages and colouring supplies. Patrons were encouraged to colour the page and post their artistic efforts beside the original. Patrons were also provided with information on visiting the special collection. Outcomes: We began releasing pages in March 2017 and as such do not have outcomes to report yet. We plan to use four metrics to evaluate the program: the number of pages distributed in library, number of pages downloaded, number of coloured pages posted, and the number of users of the special collection stating they became aware of it through the colouring pages display. We will also have a comments board and use social media to collect patron reactions to the project and will report on the total cost of the project.
Author/Creators:
Hamonic, Laura
Title:
1B1 Innovations, Challenges and Opportunities within Regional Health Libraries in British Columbia
Description:
Introduction: Faced with continual change, British Columbia regional health and ministry libraries must innovate in order to survive. To understand how these libraries are evolving, this study: 1) describes and compares the libraries, 2) analyzes how they are changing and innovating in order to deliver value, and 3) identifies gaps and opportunities in the current landscape. Methods: Librarians from seven health authorities and one ministry library completed online surveys and telephone interviews regarding eight themes drawn from the literature: library environment, research services, instruction, service delivery models, prioritization, evaluation, innovation, and the provincial landscape. The librarians later participated in a focus group to explore key findings in greater depth. Results: Libraries range considerably in role of the library in supporting open and connected research and researchers size and staffing levels. Both centralized and distributed service delivery models are in practice. Reaching library patrons from geographically remote areas is a common challenge, as is leveraging technologies needed to advance services. Reference is identified as the most valuable service provided, and all libraries recognize the importance of measuring and demonstrating the impact of this and other services. Ongoing needs assessment and evaluation activities are taking place. There is some interest in standardizing assessment procedures in the future, using similar outcome indicators to inform marketing and advocacy endeavors. Discussion: In a landscape of library closures, service consolidation and technological limitations, innovative non-traditional activities are required to improve delivery of information and resources. This project's findings promote information sharing on best practices and highlight collaborative opportunities to address existing gaps within the library systems.
Author/Creators:
Muturi-Kihara, Elisheba
Title:
1A1 Show me the money! Meeting researcher needs through a fee-based pilot project.
Description:
Introduction: In 2015, a fee for service program was piloted at the University of Alberta's Health Sciences Library to provide in-depth librarian support to the Faculty of Nursing (FON). Other examples of cost-recovery and fee-based services have been provided by other academic libraries for document delivery and searches for literature and patents. However, this fee for service pilot focused specifically on meeting the needs of FON researchers. Description: An administrative structure was developed for this program, including a fee structure. Mediated searches, systematic review searches, research support, and research impact services were offered to FON at the University of Alberta for a fee. Outcomes: During the pilot year, Sept 2015-Aug 2016, $41,500 of revenue has been generated. Ten review searches, faculty-wide research impact analysis, and a program of research support to a national research program have been contracted. Major challenges of the service include: competing priorities with core librarian work, communication, and time required to complete the work. Discussion: This program allowed us to provide an in-depth level of librarian support to researchers. An assessment revealed that researchers and administrators were very pleased and felt that it was an essential service. Based upon unsolicited requests for specialized fee-based services, there appears to be a demand and a service potential to continue the service and expand to other health sciences faculties, in particular the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.
Author/Creators:
Kung, Janice
Title:
2A1 Assessing Online Systematic Review Training: Updated Findings from an Environmental Scan and Evaluation
Description:
Introduction: Online training for systematic review (SR) methodology has become an attractive option due to its flexibility and the limited availability of in-person instruction. Librarians often direct new reviewers to these online resources, so it is important that we are knowledgeable about the variety of training resources available that best fit our patrons' needs. Methods: We reviewed the published literature and conducted an environmental scan of online SR training resources. After screening for inclusion, scores were assigned using a previously published evaluation rubric for online instruction modules. Resources were evaluated in the following areas: 1) content; 2) design; 3) interactivity; 4) usability. Scores were analyzed using descriptive statistics to compare performance across the domains. Results: Twenty resources were evaluated. Overall score average was 61%. Online courses (n=7) averaged 73%, web modules (n=5) 64%, and videos (n=8) 48%. The top five highest scoring resources were in course and web module format, featured high interactivity, and required a longer (>5hrs) time commitment from users. Conclusion: Score analysis suggests that resources include appropriate content, but are less likely to adhere to principles of web-based training design and interactivity. Just-in-time, quick resources like videos could benefit from such principles. Awareness of these resources has benefited team members and enabled them to make informed recommendations for training based on patrons' needs. Future online SR training resources should pay greater attention to established best practices for online instruction in order to provide high quality resources regardless of format or user time commitment.
Author/Creators:
Boulos, Leah
Title:
1B3 Navigating the Sea of Free: supporting Clinician Use of High-Quality Point-of-Care Moblie Applicaitons
Description:
Introduction: The Alberta Health Service's Knowledge Resource Service (KRS) supports clinicians and staff in evidence-informed decision-making, in part, by licensing point-of-care mobile applications. While the KRS team supports use of these resources with self-based education guides and education sessions, clients also ask KRS to recommend free mobile apps to supplement KRS subscriptions. The literature shows that mobile apps vary in their use of evidence, clinical relevance, and usability. Consequently, KRS is launching a monthly review of a free mobile app, to be posted on the KRS website. Description: Drawing on current literature, the program leads will identify evaluation criteria for point-of-care apps. Our first selections have been recommended by residents and clinicians; subsequent point-of-care apps will be identified via survey during resident orientations, occurring at hospital sites each summer. The resulting lists, together with ongoing reviews of the literature, will determine which apps are appraised. Outcomes: In April, KRS will launch a 'Free App of the Month' feature, providing an overview of the resource's strengths and weaknesses, information on accessibility, and links to additional literature where available. We will present two free 'App of the Month' overviews at the conference, as well as our plan to evaluate this program. Discussion: The KRS 'App of the Month' project will connect us with residents, who are native to mobile app technology, and support a wider pool of AHS clinicians considering free mobile apps to complement their practice.
Author/Creators:
Harrison, Pamela
Title:
3A2 Reading for Resilience: Bibliotherapy Lights the Road to Recovery for Mental Health Patients
Description:
Introduction: Bibliotherapy can be defined as the use of literature to help deal with the challenges of life. The authors will situate this paper within the greater body of literature on bibliotherapy, providing an overview of the practice and a detailed exploration of the use of a particular form of bibliotherapy with two different groups of mental health patients. Description: Librarians at an academic hospital partnered with their psychiatry department to deliver a read-aloud bibliotherapy program to mental health patients. Programs were delivered to both in-patients and members of a community based recovery program based at the hospital. Outcomes: Basic written evaluations were collected from participants, and interviews were conducted with the peer support workers who also attended the groups. Participants, peer-support workers, and decision makers in the mental health programs all found the projects successful and rewarding, and as a result spin-off programs have been developed and/or proposed. Discussion: Each program ran for a minimum of 6 weeks and engaged between 3 and 8 clients in each group. Peer-support workers also participated in the group sessions. Readings from literature (poetry, fiction and non-fiction) were selected and used to introduce and discuss topics such as loneliness, compassion, forgiveness, gratitude, etc. The sessions were facilitated by a librarian and a librarian/psychotherapist. The authors will describe the structure of the reading sessions, group dynamics, and the materials used to address specific topics, as well as methods for selecting materials. Suggestions and recommendations for delivering similar programs will be discussed.
Author/Creators:
Iverson, Sandra
Title:
2B3 Creating a Blended Outreach Service Model for a Province-wide Health Care Information Service
Description:
Introduction: In the past 5 years we transformed library services to a single online service that provides information services for all health care workers across the province and consolidated library locations from twenty-four to nine in three urban centres. Strategizing for consistent and sustainable outreach services is essential to meet health care professionals' information needs. While the literature on the fundamental goals of outreach programs in libraries has been prevalent, there is a gap in how to provide an effective outreach program for health care professionals working from geographically distributed sites. Description: A literature review and an internal audit of health library outreach practices were completed in the Spring/Summer of 2016. A combined subject and geographic liaison outreach service model was developed with the primary goal of ensuring all clients across the province receive the same high quality information service. Outcomes: Pilot testing of the program began in Fall 2016 and will be ongoing. The lessons learned continue to inform how to best engage library staff and evaluate the impact of the service. Discussion: A blended outreach model will streamline the processes in delivering and implementing the service, as well as enable health care professionals throughout the region to access the same level of services.
Author/Creators:
Lin, Yongtao
Title:
3B2 Online Interventions for Family Caregivers: Employing Patient Engagement Principles & Practice
Description:
Introduction: Health care professionals frequently partner with librarians when developing online tools for patients and their families. However, even with input from the most qualified of information professionals, these websites are often difficult to identify and can remain largely unused by those populations for which they were designed. The Online Interventions for Family Caregivers Study addresses this very issue. Description: Patient engagement (PE) principles and practice were utilized by inviting caregivers to participate as equal partners in all stages of the project. Their participation involved designing the internet search strategy and website review template, conducting searches for caregiver resources available on the internet, contributing to the analysis of findings, authoring the final report, and presenting results to the funding agency. Outcomes: The Canadian Strategy of Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) promotes active collaboration with individuals using the health care system to bring about positive change. By including caregivers in all aspects of our study, we have strengthened both the quality of our final report and our skills as health professionals and librarians. Our caregiver partners taught us how personal hardships and successes influence information seeking behaviours and in turn, impact how we should consider presenting and organizing information to maximize relevance and ease of use. Discussion: The purpose of this presentation is to share the values underpinning PE and to provide an overview of how PE principles can be operationalised in both information seeking research and patient focused information service design.
Author/Creators:
McKinnell, Jennifer
Title:
Mapping the Urban Frontier
Description:
Adaptation of a final project. Presentation given during "The Idea of Place: Space and Culture 20th Anniversary Conference" in May 5-7th, 2017.
Author/Creators:
Eric Tebby
Title:
When Scenes Fade and Places Matter
Description:
For over a decade, The Sly Fox Hotel in Sydney, Australia, hosted a series of events featuring drag king performances – a subcultural phenomenon where women (and other gender diverse individuals) consciously perform masculinity – that quickly became a regular feature on the lesbian social circuit. Established within a longer tradition of live performance culture but also significant within an urban night-time economy, this series of events between 2002 and 2012 functioned as a site for a range of periphery practices and experiences that cohered as a localized scene. Yet, the venue’s longevity as a drag king site is somewhat of an anomaly in Sydney’s history of commercial infrastructure where most lesbian events operate as short-lived bouts of temporary hosting arrangements. So when the venue closed its doors in 2012, it heralded the end of a once-thriving scene. By drawing on data collated from a series of focus groups held between thirteen participants at the time of the scene’s demise, alongside my own experience over a sustained five-year period, I reveal the movement by which a contemporary social moment becomes layered with historical investment. Here, expressions of nostalgia for a dead scene worked to solidify The Sly Fox Hotel as a site that anchors urban imaginaries, preserving otherwise ephemeral social experience. Via the case study of Sydney’s drag king scene, I offer insight into the temporal conditions that might structure all scenes: their emergence through to their expansion or contraction and, inevitably, their fading.
Author/Creators:
Drysdale, Kerryn
Title:
Modeling hybrid tank pilot plant using first principle model and experimental data
Description:
The Hybrid tank pilot plant was designed in Process Control Laboratory (PCL) of the University of Alberta at 2009. In this report, we try to construct a model for this process. Using the physical behavior of the plant, it is possible to have the nonlinear first principle dynamic model of that plant. However, the parameters of the model are unknown. Some experiments are designed to estimate the parameters of the model. Then the model is linearized using the relation between the nonlinear and linear model.
Author/Creators:
Alireza Fatehi
Title:
Do it Right the First Time: Copyright, Creative Commons, and OER
Description:
Presentation slides from a talk given at the Alberta OER Summit on May 11, 2017 at the School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alberta.
Author/Creators:
Wakaruk, Amanda

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