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  • http://hdl.handle.net/10048/1197
  • Symptom expectation and attribution in whiplash-associated disorders
  • Ferrari, Robert
  • en
  • whiplash injury
    whiplash-associated disorders
    neck injury
    pain
    expectations
    beliefs
    attribution
    recovery
    outcomes
    traffic collisions
  • Jul 6, 2010 8:27 PM
  • Thesis
  • en
  • Adobe PDF
  • 18021812 bytes
  • Introduction: Little is known about the effect of beliefs on whiplash-associated disorders. Objective: To assess population beliefs regarding whiplash injury, to assess expectation as a predictor of recovery; to explore symptom attribution (Study III); and, assess the relationship between the Whiplash Disability Questionnaire (WDQ) and self-assessed recovery. Materials and Methods: Canadian residents were surveyed about whiplash injury; a whiplash cohort was assessed for association between expectations of recovery and recovery; whiplash patients were examined to correlate auditory symptoms and cerumen occlusion; and, Whiplash patients were asked a global recovery question and results compared to the whiplash Disability Questionnaire (WDQ). Results: Beliefs about whiplash injury were more negative. Expectations of recovery from injury increases the recovery rate. Cerumen explains auditory symptoms in whiplash patients. Patients responding ‘yes’ to the recovery question had a low WDQ score. Conclusions: Population beliefs, expectations of recovery and symptom attribution are important in whiplash-associated disorders.
  • Master's
  • Master of Science
  • Department of Medicine
  • Fall 2010
  • Carroll, Linda J. (Public Health Sciences)
    Russell, Anthony S. (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
    McAlister, Finlay (Department of Medicine)
    Davis, Paul (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
  • Carroll, Linda J. (Public Health Sciences)
    Russell, Anthony S. (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
    McAlister, Finlay (Department of Medicine)
    Davis, Paul (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)
    Homik, Joanne (Department of Rheumatic Diseases)

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