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Lisa Tjosvold

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Lisa Tjosvold

University of Alberta Libraries

John W. Scott Health Sciences Library
2K3.28 Walter C. Mackenzi Health Sciences Centre
Edmonton, Alberta
T6G 2R7

  • ACHORD Librarian

http://hdl.handle.net/10402/era.23088

Subject areas and related deposits

  • Bronchiolitis

    • Epinephrine for bronchiolitis

      Background: Bronchodilators are commonly used for acute bronchiolitis, despite uncertain effectiveness. Objectives: To examine the efficacy and safety of epinephrine in children less than two with acute viral bronchiolitis. Search methods: We searched CENTRAL (2010, Issue 3) which contains the Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialized Register, MEDLINE (1950 to September Week 2, 2010), EMBASE (1980 to September 2010), Scopus (1823 to September 2010), PubMed (March 2010), LILACS (1985 to September 2010) and Iran MedEx (1998 to September 2010). Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials comparing epinephrine to placebo or another intervention involving children less than two years with acute viral bronchiolitis. Studies were included if the trials presented data for at least one quantitative outcome of interest. We selected primary outcomes a priori, based on clinical relevance: rate of admission by days one and seven of presentation for outpatients, and length of stay (LOS) for inpatients. Secondary outcomes included clinical severity scores, pulmonary function, symptoms, quality of life and adverse events. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently screened the searches, applied inclusion criteria, assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence. We conducted separate analyses for different comparison groups (placebo, non-epinephrine bronchodilators, glucocorticoids) and for clinical setting (inpatient, outpatient). Main results: We included 19 studies (2256 participants). Epinephrine versus placebo among outpatients showed a significant reduction in admissions at Day 1 (risk ratio (RR) 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50 to 0.89) but not at Day 7 post-emergency department visit. There was no difference in LOS for inpatients. Epinephrine versus salbutamol showed no differences among outpatients for admissions at Day 1 or 7. Inpatients receiving epinephrine had a significantly shorter LOS compared to salbutamol (mean difference -0.28; 95% CI -0.46 to -0.09). One large RCT showed a significantly shorter admission rate at Day 7 for epinephrine and steroid combined versus placebo (RR 0.65; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.95). There were no important differences in adverse events. Authors' conclusions: This review demonstrates the superiority of epinephrine compared to placebo for short-term outcomes for outpatients, particularly in the first 24 hours of care. Exploratory evidence from a single study suggests benefits of epinephrine and steroid combined for later time points. More research is required to confirm the benefits of combined epinephrine and steroids among outpatients. There is no evidence of effectiveness for repeated dose or prolonged use of epinephrine or epinephrine and dexamethasone combined among inpatients.

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    • Glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants and young children

      BACKGROUND: Previous systematic reviews have not shown clear benefit of glucocorticoids for acute viral bronchiolitis, but their use remains considerable. Recent large trials add substantially to current evidence and suggest novel glucocorticoid-including treatment approaches. OBJECTIVES: To review the efficacy and safety of systemic and inhaled glucocorticoids in children with acute viral bronchiolitis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 4); MEDLINE (1950 to November 2009); EMBASE (1980 to Week 47 2009); LILACS (1982 to November 2009); Scopus® (1823 to November 2009); and IRAN MedEx (1998 to November 2009). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing short-term systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids versus placebo or another intervention in children < 24 months with acute bronchiolitis (first episode with wheezing). Our primary outcomes were: admissions by days 1 and 7 for outpatient studies; and length of stay (LOS) for inpatient studies. Secondary outcomes included clinical severity parameters, healthcare use, pulmonary function, symptoms, quality of life and harms. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently extracted data on study and participant characteristics, interventions and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias and graded strength of evidence. Inpatient and outpatient results were meta-analysed separately using random-effects models. We pre-specified subgroup analyses, including the combined use of protocolised bronchodilators. MAIN RESULTS: We included 17 trials (2596 participants); only two had low overall risk of bias. Baseline severity, glucocorticoid schemes, comparators and outcomes were heterogeneous. Glucocorticoids did not significantly reduce outpatient admissions by days 1 and 7 when compared to placebo (pooled risk ratios (RRs) 0.92; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.08; and 0.86; 95% CI 0.7 to 1.06, respectively). There was no benefit in LOS for inpatients (mean difference -0.18 days; 95% CI -0.39 to 0.04). Unadjusted results from a large factorial low risk of bias RCT found combined high-dose systemic dexamethasone and inhaled epinephrine reduced admissions by day 7 (baseline risk of admission 26%; RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.95; number needed to treat 11, 95% CI 7 to 76), with no differences in short-term adverse effects. No other comparisons showed relevant differences in primary outcomes. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Current evidence does not support a clinically relevant effect of systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids on admissions or length of hospitalization. Combined dexamethasone and epinephrine may reduce outpatient admissions, but results are exploratory and safety data limited. Future research should further assess the efficacy, harms and applicability of combined therapy.

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  • Critical Ilness

    • Nutritional support for critically ill children

      Background: Nutritional support in the critically ill child has not been well investigated and is a controversial topic within paediatric intensive care. There are no clear guidelines as to the best form or timing of nutrition in critically ill infants and children. Objectives: To assess the impact of enteral and total parenteral nutrition on clinically important outcomes for critically ill children. Search methods: We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1); Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to February 2007); Ovid EMBASE (1988 to February 2007); OVID Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews; ISI Web of Science - Science Citation Index Expanded (1965 to February 2007); WebSPIRS Biological Abstracts (1969 to February 2007); and WebSPIRS CAB Abstracts (1972 to February 2007). We also searched trial registries; reviewed reference lists of all potentially relevant studies; handsearched relevant conference proceedings; and contacted experts in the area and manufacturers of enteral and parenteral nutrition products. We did not limit the search by language or publication status. Selection criteria: We included studies if they were randomized controlled trials; involved paediatric patients, aged one day to 18 years of age, cared for in a paediatric intensive care unit setting (PICU) and received nutrition within the first seven days of admission; and reported data for at least one of the pre-specified outcomes (30-day or PICU mortality; length of stay in PICU or hospital; number of ventilator days; and morbid complications, such as nosocomial infections). We excluded studies if they only reported nutritional outcomes, quality of life assessments, or economic implications. Furthermore, other areas of paediatric nutrition, such as immunonutrition and different routes of delivering enteral nutrition, were not addressed in this review. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently screened searches, applied inclusion criteria, and performed quality assessments. We resolved discrepancies through discussion and consensus. One author extracted data and a second checked data for accuracy and completeness. Main results: Only one trial was identified as relevant. Seventy-seven children in intensive care with burns involving > 25% of the total body surface area were randomized to either enteral nutrition within 24 hours or after at least 48 hours. No statistically significant differences were observed for mortality, sepsis, ventilator days, length of stay, unexpected adverse events, resting energy expenditure, nitrogen balance, or albumin levels. The trial was assessed as of low methodological quality (based on the Jadad scale) with an unclear risk of bias. Authors' conclusions: There was only one randomized trial relevant to the review question. Research is urgently needed to identify best practices regarding the timing and forms of nutrition for critically ill infants and children.

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  • Indexing - Aboriginal Peoples - Canada

    • Finding Canadian polar Indigenous studies in Medline

      The polar library community has made much progress over the past thirty years in the development of bibliographic search tools that allow fast and easy access to publications about the Arctic and Antarctic. Many of us rely heavily on tools such as Arctic and Antarctic Regions to satisfy our need for information organized with a geographic focus. For Circumpolar health researchers, there is now the growing Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database, a subset of the Arctic Science and Technology Information System (ASTIS), which is improving access to polar health materials. However, when conducting systematic review searches, searchers are required to be as comprehensive as possible, which means that all relevant subject databases must be searched, even if overlap is substantial. As a result, Medline must be searched as part of any systematic review search related to Indigenous health issues in Canada’s Arctic regions. While the MESH Subject Headings and Geographic Headings do supply some controlled vocabulary access, keywords must also be searched to make the search comprehensive. This goal of this project is to create a Medline search filter which will assure comprehensive retrieval of Canadian Indigenous materials

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  • Librarians - Graduate Education

    • Teaching Health Sciences Librarianship with a very large team:

      Eleven practicing academic health librarians at the University of Alberta taught LIS 520: Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship as a large team. This study evaluated the students’ responses to being taught by a large team and the librarians’ responses to teaching in a large team. Overall, both groups were positive about the experience. The librarians documented best practices for teaching with a large team.

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  • Poster - Canadian Cochrane Symposium 2008

  • Poster - Medical Librarianship

  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic

    • A descriptive analysis of a representative sample of pediatric randomized controlled trials published in 2007

      BACKGROUND: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for trials assessing the effects of therapeutic interventions; therefore it is important to understand how they are conducted. Our objectives were to provide an overview of a representative sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 and assess the validity of their results. METHODS: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials using a pediatric filter and randomly selected 300 RCTs published in 2007. We extracted data on trial characteristics; outcomes; methodological quality; reporting; and registration and protocol characteristics. Trial registration and protocol availability were determined for each study based on the publication, an Internet search and an author survey. RESULTS: Most studies (83%) were efficacy trials, 40% evaluated drugs, and 30% were placebo-controlled. Primary outcomes were specified in 41%; 43% reported on adverse events. At least one statistically significant outcome was reported in 77% of trials; 63% favored the treatment group. Trial registration was declared in 12% of publications and 23% were found through an Internet search. Risk of bias (ROB) was high in 59% of trials, unclear in 33%, and low in 8%. Registered trials were more likely to have low ROB than non-registered trials (16% vs. 5%; p = 0.008). Effect sizes tended to be larger for trials at high vs. low ROB (0.28, 95% CI 0.21,0.35 vs. 0.16, 95% CI 0.07,0.25). Among survey respondents (50% response rate), the most common reason for trial registration was a publication requirement and for non-registration, a lack of familiarity with the process. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of this random sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 was at high ROB and three quarters of trials were not registered. There is an urgent need to improve the design, conduct, and reporting of child health research.

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  • Search Filters - Canadian Indignenous Peoples - Saskatchewan - Canada

  • Search Filters - Indignenous Peoples - Nova Scotia - Canada

  • Systematic Reviews as Topic

    • A descriptive analysis of child-relevant systematic reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

      Background: Systematic reviews (SRs) are considered an important tool for decision-making. There has been no recent comprehensive identification or description of child-relevant SRs. A description of existing child-relevant SRs would help to identify the extent of available child-relevant evidence available in SRs and gaps in the evidence base where SRs are required. The objective of this study was to describe child-relevant SRs from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR, Issue 2, 2009).Methods: SRs were assessed for relevance using pre-defined criteria. Data were extracted and entered into an electronic form. Univariate analyses were performed to describe the SRs overall and by topic area.Results: The search yielded 1666 SRs; 793 met the inclusion criteria. 38% of SRs were last assessed as up-to-date prior to 2007. Corresponding authors were most often from the UK (41%). Most SRs (59%) examined pharmacological interventions. 53% had at least one external source of funding. SRs included a median of 7 studies (IQR 3, 15) and 679 participants (IQR 179, 2833). Of all studies, 48% included only children, and 27% only adults. 94% of studies were published in peer-reviewed journals. Primary outcomes were specified in 72% of SRs. Allocation concealment and the Jadad scale were used in 97% and 25% of SRs, respectively. Adults and children were analyzed separately in 12% of SRs and as a subgroup analysis in 14%. Publication bias was assessed in only 14% of SRs. A meta-analysis was conducted in 68% of SRs with a median of 5 trials (IQR 3, 9) each. Variations in these characteristics were observed across topic areas.Conclusions: We described the methodological characteristics and rigour of child-relevant reviews in the CDSR. Many SRs are not up-to-date according to Cochrane criteria. Our study describes variation in conduct and reporting across SRs and reveals clinicians' ability to access child-specific data.

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