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Judy Gnarpe

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FSO (teaching)

Judy Gnarpe

Medical Microbiology & Immunology

judy.gnarpe@ualberta.ca
Curriculum Vitae

  • DrMedSci
  • RM(CCM)
  • PG DipMedEd

  • Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Clinical Microbiology
  • Game Learning

  • Professor of the Week 2007 (Student's Union Award)
  • William Hardy Alexander Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

http://hdl.handle.net/10402/era.24538

Subject areas and related deposits

  • Bacteriology

  • Educational games

    • Brainspan Learning Games: What's in it for Instructors?

      Background: A multiplayer learning game was developed for use in the preclinical courses at our medical school. The resource was developed from two perspectives: student and instructor. Students use the game to review course concepts and to test themselves for exam preparation. Instructors have different needs and this poster describes how the game system can be used to improve teaching practices. Methodology: Instructors can make games to review lectures and by asking students to complete the game of the day, get good feedback about potential problems and levels of understanding . Instructors can generate reports of several types that help steer the teaching process ; individual student performance on game questions is one parameter useful for identification of students who need more attention. Instructors can also generate reports on the subcategories of the major subject and see how students are doing in different areas of the course, which can lead to a change in teaching practices if deficiencies are found. A major useful function of the game system is the ability to make a quiz game and receive an item analysis on individual multiple choice questions, helping standardize the quality of the course examinations. This game system was used as a tool for an assignment: students were required to submit multiple choice questions , all students answered the questions and the file was sent for item analysis. In this manner, standardized criteria were applied for assessment of assignment quality. Conclusions: Use of game systems for feedback and assessment is an easy way for instructors to interact with students outside of class. Added advantages include the ability to assess student performance and areas of difficulty.

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    • The Learning Game: What can it do for Instructors and Students

      Background: An asynchronous multiplayer online learning game was developed for use in the preclinical courses at our medical school. This game system is now used by other courses in the Faculty of Medicine and is gaining popularity in other faculties. The resource was developed according to perceived needs of both the student and the instructor. Students use the game to review course concepts; receive instructor feedback about the question content; challenge other students in the class, creating an enjoyable competition and increasing interaction in the community of learners; test themselves for exams and communicate directly with the instructor through the system. Instructors can use the games to determine if their teaching practice has been effective, to extend the content in a course and to standardize new multiple choice exam questions before using them in exams. Within the questions provided, the instructor can add images or links to other websites, allowing for a more visual learning experience and enriching content. Methodology: Surveys were administered to students in the undergraduate medical program and students in a medical microbiology class for nursing. Students were asked if they thought the learning games enhanced their learning, provided more support for them during the course, provided an enjoyable way to review course material and reduced the stress that they felt during the course. They were also asked to provide prose comments about the games and their perception of the advantages for their learning. Discussion: Instructors make games using multiple choice questions to review course content, and by making the learning resource available to students can get good feedback about problems and levels of understanding. “Games” can be comprehensive, covering a whole course or can be constructed from material derived for only one lecture, providing a just-in-time snapshot of teaching and learning effectiveness. Reports of several types can be generated to help steer the teaching process: individual student performance on game questions is useful for identification of students who need more attention and individual question performance can give insights into how well the material was presented. Instructors can generate reports on the subcategories of the major subject to see how students are doing in different areas of the course, which can lead to a change in teaching practices if deficiencies are found. A major useful function of the system for instructors is the ability to standardize new multiple choice questions by using item analysis before using these questions in an examination. Conclusions: Providing online quizzes in a course with small game-type characteristics increased student satisfaction with their courses and reduced student self-perceived stress. Use of game systems for feedback and assessment allows instructors to interact with students outside of class. Added advantages include the ability to assess student performance and areas of difficulty and increase engagement with course content.

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    • Student Assessment of Learning Gains (with E-resources)

      In the health professions, even more so than in other programs, a mastery of content related to patient care and infection control is of paramount importance. Nursing students and dental hygiene students are required to take MMI 133, Medical Microbiology for Health Professionals. This is a large class and in order to adequately provide resources for the students, a learning management system is utilized to increase student participation with the course material and with the course instructors and teaching assistants. The SALG (student assessment of learning gains) is a validated, standardized survey that can be customized for individual courses. We administered the survey to the health professional students at the end of their Medical Microbiology for Health Professional course, MMI 133. The participation rate for the survey was 28%. Students rated the e-resources according to their perceived learning gains, including learning games and quizzes of many different types, and instructor/TA led chat rooms. Results for questions about learning games where: 64% of students found small simple learning games very helpful; 73% found the Vista self quizzes helpful and 82% found the large multiplayer games very helpful. 84% of students thought that the instructor feedback provided in the multiplayer games was important for their learning. 61% reported gains as a result of the chatrooms throughout the course and 85% of students felt that the content they learned in the course would be useful for them in the clinical situation.

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  • Elearning

  • Flashcard

  • Phagocytosis

  • Virology