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Dale Storie

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Liaison Librarian to School of Public Health and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Dale Storie

University of Alberta Libraries

2K3.28 Walter Mackenzie Centre
(780) 492-7952
dale.storie@ualberta.ca

  • Public Services Librarian, John W. Scott Health Sciences Library

http://hdl.handle.net/10402/era.17160

Subject areas and related deposits

  • Altmetrics

  • Cheesie Mack Is Not a Genius or Anything by Steve Colter

  • Computer-assisted instruction

    • Keeping students engaged by simulating continuing medical education

      The objective was to convert a paper-based seeking and evaluating evidence assignment to an interactive electronic format. In addition, the aim was to increase medical student engagement with the assignment by simulating a continuing medical education environment that many students will encounter in their future medical careers. The College of Family Physicians of Canada’s ePearls™ continuing medical education environment was adapted for use as a student assignment and embedded in the medical school’s learning management system. The assignment was delivered during the transitional course that bridges students’ pre-clinical and clinical experiences. All of the students had completed a similar paper based assignment within the previous two years. Students completed the interactive electronic assignment during class time. At the end of the session, students were asked to complete an electronic survey which was designed to measure their preference for the paper or electronic delivery of the assignment and whether or not the delivery in the context of a continuing medical education environment was engaging for them. 42 of the 155 students who completed the assignment also completed part or all of the online survey. Most respondents perceived the introduction to the continuing medical education environment as being helpful (86%, n=40) and expressed a preference for doing the assignment in the online format (86%, n=42). Comments indicated that students valued its clinical relevance and the opportunity to immediately practice what they had learned while still having guidance at hand. Based on these results, the Library and CHE will collaborate together to deliver subsequent information literacy instruction in this format.

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  • Continuing medical education

    • Using a Professional Continuing Medical Education Simulation to Engage Undergraduate Medical Students in Information Literacy

      Objective: 1. To engage students by delivering an Evidence Based Medicine assignment in a system that simulates a professional medical continuing education system that many participants will use in residency and practice. 2. To convert a paper-based “searching for and evaluating evidence” assignment to an interactive electronic format, embedded in a course management system. Methods: The College of Family Physicians of Canada's Pearls™ continuing medical education program was simplified for use by medical students beginning their Clinical Clerkship. All of the students had completed a similar paper-based assignment within the previous two years. Students completed the interactive electronic assignment during class time. At the end of the session students were asked to complete an electronic survey which was designed to measure their preference for the paper or electronic delivery of the assignment and whether or not the delivery in the context of a continuing medical education program was engaging for them. Results: Evidence gathered through the surveys showed that the students preferred the interactive electronic version of the assignment and that most of the students valued the introduction to the continuing medical education environment. Conclusion: Based on this research, this program will be integrated further into the information literacy instruction of undergraduate medical students.

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  • Everyone Plays at the Library: Creating Great Gaming Experiences for All Ages, by Scott Nicholson

  • Information literacy

    • Determining the information literacy needs of a medical and dental faculty

      Introduction: The Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta is large and diverse. Liaison librarians at the Health Sciences Library decided in late 2009 to undertake a system-wide evaluation of the information literacy (IL) instruction being delivered to the Faculty. The goals of the evaluation were to identify current strengths and gaps in instruction, to realign teaching priorities, and to inform the development of effective asynchronous Web-based delivery mechanisms, such as interactive tutorials, to support the Faculty’s move to electronic course delivery. Methods: The main data collection method was a survey of different user groups in the Faculty, including undergraduate and graduate students, residents, and faculty. Secondary data included a literature review, consultation with key collaborators and analyzing program documents. Results: All undergraduate medical students receive IL instruction. Fewer than a third of graduate students, only half of residents, and a small fraction of faculty, receive instruction. The current curriculum needs to be revised to be less repetitive. Most respondents wanted to receive training on advanced database searching, and preferred in-person instruction sessions. Web-based tutorials were the next most popular mode of delivery. Discussion: This study is one of the few medical information literacy surveys that used a broad, strategic approach to surveying all user groups at a medical school. These data provide a baseline overview of existing instruction across user groups, determine potential need for IL instruction, provide direction for what should be taught, and identify preferred methods for delivery of a comprehensive training program centered on Faculty needs.

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  • Liar, Liar: The Theory, Practice, and Destructive Properties of Deception by Gary Paulsen

  • Librarians - Graduate Education

    • Teaching Health Sciences Librarianship with a very large team:

      Eleven practicing academic health librarians at the University of Alberta taught LIS 520: Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship as a large team. This study evaluated the students’ responses to being taught by a large team and the librarians’ responses to teaching in a large team. Overall, both groups were positive about the experience. The librarians documented best practices for teaching with a large team.

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  • Mitchell's License by Hallie Durand

  • Mobile devices

    • Information Use on Mobile Devices in Medicine

      Introduction: Little is known about medical trainees’ and clinicians’ current use of mobile devices for information-seeking, including the resources they use and in what context. This study was designed to better understand what types of mobile information resources this population finds valuable, how and why they find them valuable, what criteria they use in selecting resources, and what kinds of problems they encounter in using mobile resources. It investigates how students, residents and faculty members in Canadian medical faculties use mobile devices such as smart phones (e.g. iPhone, Android, Blackberry) and tablet computers (e.g. iPad), specifically in relation to their studies and professional environment. Methods: This is a multi-site study at five Canadian universities. An electronic survey was distributed by medical librarians at each university to medical students, residents, and faculty members via departmental listservs, personal contacts, and relevant websites. The survey investigates the types of information sought, frequency of and reasons for mobile device use in medical information-seeking, access barriers, support needs, familiarity with institutionally-licensed resources, and personal purchasing of resources. Qualitative information was solicited by asking for a specific incident in which a mobile device was used to answer a clinical question. Results: Data from over 800 survey responses, demonstrating the trends at the participating universities, will be presented. Discussion: The discussion will address how academic health libraries can effectively support mobile technology and collections in light of survey results.

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  • Poster - CHLA Conference 2010

    • From Triage to the Big Picture: Developing a Comprehensive Information Literacy Program for a Medical Faculty

      The Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta is large and diverse. Liaison librarians at the health sciences library are evaluating the information literacy (IL) instruction being delivered to the Faculty, in order to identify current strengths and gaps in instruction, realign teaching priorities, and develop effective asynchronous delivery mechanisms. The end-goal of this evaluation will be the development of a comprehensive IL program that meets the needs of all constituents within the Faculty. This program will be implemented and evaluated in stages over the next three years.

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  • Poster - Medical Librarianship

  • Quality improvement

    • Categories of Quality Improvement Interventions

      Categories of quality improvement interventions used in Lau D, Hu J, Majumdar SR, Storie DA, Rees SE, Johnson JA. Interventions to Improve Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates Among Community-Dwelling Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Annals of Family Medicine 2012 (Accepted manuscript). Modified from Shojania et al., JAMA, 2006 (see related link).

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  • Really Simple Syndication

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  • Textbooks

    • The Constancy of the School ‘Canon’: A Survey of Texts Used in Grade 10 English Language Arts in 2006 and 1996

      This article reports on a 2006 survey of texts used in Grade 10 English language arts classes in Edmonton, Alberta. The survey uses the same instrument as a previous 1996 survey and provides comparative data from a section of the same pool as participated in 1996. In terms of the most popular titles, there has been very little change during that decade. To Kill a Mockingbird and Romeo and Juliet continue to be the most widely taught texts by a considerable margin. Texts taught in only one class show more variability. Reasons for the striking constancy of the title list are considered.

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  • The Fantastic Flying Books of Morris Lessmore by William Joyce