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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R36H99

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Representations of Aboriginal women in pregnancy information sources: a critical discourse analysis Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Postcolonialism
Pregnancy
Indigenous
Knowledge
Medicalization
Information seeking
Consumer health
Critical discourse analysis
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ritcey, Chantal
Supervisor and department
Given, Lisa (School of Library and Information Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Julien, Heidi (School of Library and Information Studies)
Jardine, Cindy (School of Public Health)
Department
School of Library and Information Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-24T16:16:35Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Library and Information Studies
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The goal of this study is to critically examine health information sources in order to determine whether Aboriginal women are represented in these resources, and if so, how they are being presented. This research is intended to illuminate the practices around the construction of information, and to demonstrate that the manners in which information is conveyed can be problematic. To accomplish these goals, critical discourse analysis was utilized to explore both consumer health publications available to pregnant women in Edmonton, Alberta, as well as academic publications available to students and healthcare providers through the University of Alberta Libraries. Through this critical analysis of these resources, it is clear that information is being constructed in a manner that supports neocolonial practices and reinforces negative stereotypes of Aboriginal women. The analysis of these sources also demonstrates ways in which information can be constructed more appropriately, to avoid racializing tendencies.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R36H99
Rights
License granted by Chantal Ritcey (critcey@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-23T17:53:10Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Critical Discourse Analysis and Postcolonial Theory 8
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