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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3C09P

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Palestinian civil society and the struggle for self-determination: the impact of donor agendas Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Palestinian
donors
disciplinary power
collective action
civil society
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Alzaghari, Saleh
Supervisor and department
Mojtaba Mahdavi, Political Science
Examining committee member and department
Yasmeen Abu-Laban, Political Science
Ibrahim Abu-Rabi, Edmonton Council of Muslim Communities Chair in Islamic Studies, University of Alberta
Department
Department of Political Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-27T16:35:10Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis explores the ways in which international donors have attempted to shape and control civil society organizations in the occupied Palestinian territories. It employs Foucault's concepts of power/knowledge and disciplinary power to investigate and theorize the power-relations that govern the interactions of donors with civil society organizations. It contends that international donors have construed the concept of civil society in such a way that made it possible to partition social space into two incommensurable ‘civic’ and ‘political’ spheres. International donors have demanded that organizations limit their activities to the ‘civic’ sphere. Moreover, the thesis argues that per the requirements of discipline that the objects of its surveillance be rendered visible and subject to technologies of control, donors have used both statistical surveys and administrative techniques to classify, categorize, observe and monitor civil society organizations. These modes of surveillance are then used for locating civil society organizations in one of the ‘civic’ and ‘political’ spheres.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3C09P
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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