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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3492Z

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Interactions between the forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hubner) and its natural enemies: the effects of forest composition and implications for outbreak spread Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
predation
forest tent caterpillar
population dynamics
parasitism
outbreak
boreal
mixedwood
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Nixon, Amy E
Supervisor and department
Roland, Jens (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Erbilgin, Nadir (Renewable Resources)
Lewis, Mark (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-06-15T21:30:01Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hübner; FTC), a major defoliator of aspen trees, occupies both aspen and mixedwood forest stands in Alberta’s boreal forest. Forest stand composition could influence the spatial pattern of FTC outbreaks if mortality from natural enemies differs between stand types. I conducted field experiments to determine whether predator- or parasitoid-caused mortality of FTC differed between aspen and mixedwood forest stands and developed a spatial population model to determine the effects of variation in generalist predation on the spread of an FTC outbreak, including the effects of potential predator-caused Allee effects. Generalist predation on FTC was higher in aspen stands than in mixedwood stands, and the spatial model suggests that these observed differences may be sufficiently large to impact FTC outbreak spread rates. Forest stand composition may contribute to the spatial pattern of FTC outbreaks through variation in the impacts of predators on FTC populations.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3492Z
Rights
License granted by Amy Nixon (aenixon@ualberta.ca) on 2011-06-14T19:34:06Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Thesis June13.pdf
File title: Thesis June13
File author: Amy Nixon
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