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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3N917

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Implicit and Explicit Self-Esteem, Narcissism, Risk, and Psychopathy in a Forensic Population Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
implicit self-esteem
psychopathy
narcissism
explicit self-esteem
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Kostiuk, Nicole E
Supervisor and department
Truscott, Derek (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Seto, Michael (University of Toronto)
Pei, Jacqueline (Educational Psychology)
Buck, George (Educational Psychology)
Whelton, William (Educational Psychology)
Gross, Douglas (Physical Therapy)
Jung, Sandy (Psychology, MacEwan University)
Frenzel, Roy (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Counselling Psychology
Date accepted
2012-05-14T15:35:09Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Abstract The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the relationships between explicit and implicit self-esteem, offender categorization, risk of reoffence, narcissism, and psychopathy. Participants were 90 adult male offenders sentenced for a nonviolent, violent, or sexual offence against a child, recruited from both federal and provincial institutions. Participants completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Survey, a self-esteem implicit association test (IAT), the Narcissism Personality Inventory, and the Self-Report Psychopathy Scale – III. File information was used to collect demographic information and to score the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide and/or Sexual Offence Risk Appraisal Guide. It was found that sexual offenders had lower explicit, but not implicit, self-esteem scores than the nonviolent and violent offenders. Offender group, risk of reoffence, narcissism, and psychopathy could not be predicted by main effects or interaction effects of self-esteem. Overall, the results suggest that self-esteem, whether explicit or implicit, at most plays a very minor role in criminal behaviour.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3N917
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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