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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35627

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The deformability of hypothermically stored red blood cells Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
blood
deformability
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Stadnick, Hart Peter Argyle
Supervisor and department
Dr. Jelena Holovati (Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Dr. Jason Acker (Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Rodrigo Onell (Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Dr. Thomas Churchill (Surgery)
Department
Medical Sciences - Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-04-14T18:39:56Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Transfusion medicine is dependent upon the ability to hypothermically preserve red blood cell (RBC) function ex vivo. Recent evidence suggests that the deformability of hypothermically stored RBCs may be compromised, potentially leading to microvasculature occlusion and tissue hypoxia in transfused patients. The main objectives of this thesis were to develop an ektacytometric technique suitable for detecting RBC deformability changes, establish whether deficits in RBC deformability due to hypothermic storage are occurring, and investigate liposomes as a biopreservation tool to modify the function of RBC membranes. This thesis demonstrates that hypothermic storage leads to RBC deformability impairments which can be detected by ektacytometry. In addition, this thesis has shown that the membrane characteristics and deformability of hypothermically stored RBCs can be differentially modified by treatment with liposomes of varying chemical composition. Through these investigations, this thesis has contributed to the advancement of the fields of transfusion medicine and biopreservation science.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35627
Rights
License granted by Hart Stadnick (hps@ualberta.ca) on 2011-04-14T16:30:55Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 2027465
Last modified: 2015:10:22 06:13:41-06:00
Filename: Stadnick_Hart_Spring 2011.pdf
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File title: Introduction
File author: Hart Stadnick
Page count: 160
File language: en-CA
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