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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R36970624

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Caribou Consumption in Northern Canadian Communities Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Arctic food economy
Household diets
Caribou
Food demand
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Chiu, Angie G
Supervisor and department
Parlee, Brenda (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Goddard, Ellen (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Willows, Noreen (Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Science)
Adamowicz, Vic (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Department
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Specialization
Agricultural and Resource Economics
Date accepted
2013-10-02T07:53:31Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The health of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) is impacted by multiple risk factors, which may affect availability of caribou for consumption. From analysis of secondary dietary intake data, consuming caribou was found to be positively related to measures of diet quality—caloric intake and dietary diversity score. Other country foods, beef, or pork may be substituted for caribou with increases in opportunity cost and out-of-pocket costs for obtaining caribou. Caribou consumption levels are predicted to vary across and within regions. Communities with older populations, lower employment rates and access to stores are likely to be impacted more by changes in the health of caribou. Analysis of federal survey data highlights the potential constraints on consumption of country meat and fish—increased household employment activity supports participation in harvesting, but leads to a decreased likelihood of consuming high levels of country meat and fish.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R36970624
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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