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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3C24QZ6M

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Restoring Native Grassland Function in Urban Environment: Implications for Soil-Plant Relations Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Land reclamation
Soil process
Biochar
Native grassland
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Amini, Seyedeharezoo
Supervisor and department
Mackenzie, Derek (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Cahill, James (Biological Science)
Quideau, Sylvie (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Land reclamation and Remediation
Date accepted
2013-06-24T15:48:10Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The area of rough fescue prairie has been reduced in Western Canada because of human activities. Larch Park is an Edmonton residential development area to which land reclamation and restoration ecology have been applied to rebuild natural grasslands instead of turf grasses. By using salvaged soil, planting native communities, and adding biochar we expected ecosystem function and services in reclaimed site to be more similar to natural grassland site. A greenhouse study was also conducted to examine the effects of biochar and native species on soil processes. Disturbance followed by land reclamation at Larch Park caused drastic changes in soil processes including higher nitrogen availability, lower microbial biomass, and lower visual variability of microbial community structure. Greenhouse results showed stimulatory effects of native species on microbial biomass and respiration, and decreasing impact on nitrogen availability. The results also indicated that biochar had some significant interaction effect on soil-plant processes.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3C24QZ6M
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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