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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3W34G

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Scaling of effervescent atomization and industrial two-phase flow Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Scaling
Bubble
Droplet
Photonics
Multiphase
Nozzle
Phase Doppler Particle Anemometer
Atomization
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rahman, Mohammad
Supervisor and department
Brian Fleck (Mechanical Engineering)
Ted Heidrick (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Darko Matovic (Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University)
Dr. André G. McDonald (Mechanical Engineering)
Dr. Ergun Kuru (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-12-21T22:45:50Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The objective of this thesis was to develop a novel understanding of the mechanics of two phase gas-liquid flows and sprays injected through industrial effervescent nozzles. This was done using detailed experimental investigations and scaling for two-phase flows and sprays. This study helps to quantify near-field liquid and gas phase statistics that are challenging and impossible to measure in the reactors due to inaccessibility restrictions. The development of nozzles is generally performed on air-water systems. My plan was to begin with the study of small-scale sprays (air and water) to compare to full scale industrial conditions at pilot operation (air-water) or at commercial operation (steam-bitumen), to determine size scaling relationships. The relationship between the lab scale air-water experiments and real industrial scale steam-bitumen has never been fully examined. Knowledge from this thesis will make the development of future nozzles with much less dependent on trial and error. This thesis was an attempt to establish fundamental scaling relationships for the prediction of two-phase spray behavior that can be applied directly to full scale industrial size nozzles that would be of very significant value to industries and to the scientific community in general. Understanding the performance of two phase nozzles through established scaling laws will aid in optimizing the two phase nozzle flow conditions and will serve as a major tool in nozzle design and development for future generation nozzles for many industrial applications.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3W34G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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