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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TM72850

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Masquerade and Modernity in the Cypress Hills: Performing Prairie Photography in the late 1870s Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Photography
Settler
Tintype
Colonialism
Modernity
Archive
Cypress Hills
Stereograph
Aboriginal
Masquerade
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Caverhill, Heather M.
Supervisor and department
Boone, M. Elizabeth (Art and Design)
Examining committee member and department
McTavish, Lianne (Art and Design)
Carter, Sarah (History and Classics)
Department
Department of Art and Design
Specialization
History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture
Date accepted
2014-08-29T13:41:17Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Both Aboriginal people and settlers of European descent participated in the construction of a series of curious tintypes set in the late-1870s Cypress Hills. The portraits perform complex and fluid cultural identities and they represent the particular conditions of modernity experienced by those present during the last years of shared land and resource use on the Canadian Prairies. As one-of-a-kind private mementos or souvenir objects, tintype photographs anticipate intimate viewing and limited circulation. Well over a century since their construction, the original tintypes have all been reproduced, they have entered into large photograph archives, and they have been used in different, and in some cases incongruous, forms of discourse pertaining to the early years of non-Aboriginal settlement in Western Canada. With this thesis I look closely at the details of the works and I consider how the images continue to complicate and challenge the stereotypes and frontier narratives that they have been used to illustrate.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3TM72850
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: REVISED_FRONT_MATTER28Aug2014
File author: heathercaverhill
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