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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34M8B

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Examining Historical Climate with Respect to Future Permafrost and Engineering Design: An Analysis of Common Assumptions and Calculations Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Engineering
Permafrost
Climate
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Adamczak, Kateri M.
Supervisor and department
Wilson, Ward (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Sego, David (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Chanasyk, David (Renewable Resources)
Sego, David (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Wilson, Ward (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Davies, Evan (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization
Geotechnical Engineering
Date accepted
2012-07-04T15:25:57Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This paper examines changes in climate with respect to permafrost and engineering design in Arctic regions. Current understanding of climate changes, predictive modeling, and climate data were studied. Inconsistencies and differences were noted, discussed, and evaluated using comparisons of the resulting climate data and graphs. A graphical analysis was done to compare different methods of data analysis and different visual interpretations of historical climate trends. The graphical analyses in this paper should be used as a guide for determining the accuracy of thermal design parameters applied to current project designs. The methodology used to evaluate raw data can greatly affect the output values used in design. It is important to understand the affect of different methods of evaluation. Review of this examination will provide designers and planners a better understanding of the complexity of climate data, data trends, and factors considered when applying climate variables to arctic design.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34M8B
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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