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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3F47H50C

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Physician specialty influences tertiary care pediatric asthma management Open Access

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Other title
Physician specialty influences pediatric asthma management at tertiary care clinic
Subject/Keyword
Pediatrics
Spirometry
Physician training
Inhaled Corticosteroids
Asthma
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Aung, Yin N
Supervisor and department
Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan (School of Public Health)
Mandhane, Piushkumar J (Pediatrics)
Examining committee member and department
Mandhane, Piushkumar J (Pediatrics)
Mackie, Andrew (Pediatrics)
Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan (School of Public Health)
Johnson, Jeffrey A (School of Public Health)
Department
School of Public Health Sciences
Specialization
Clinical Epidemiology
Date accepted
2013-08-30T10:09:09Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Physician training influences the care that a patient receives. A retrospective cohort of children over 6 years of age, seen in a multi-disciplinary asthma clinic between 2009 and 2010 and followed to 2012, was completed to identify differences in pediatric asthma management by physician specialty. Multilevel logistic regression analysis examined differences by physician specialty for prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Over 56% of the patients were seen by pediatric respirologists, 26% by pediatric allergists and 18% by pediatricians. Differences in investigations by specialty reflected on co-morbid diagnoses and treatment. Pediatricians were less likely to prescribe ICS (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.15 – 0.96, p<0.05) than pediatric allergists with the greatest difference in ICS prescription among children with a %FEV1 greater than 80%. Treatment with ICS among children with mild asthma is most heavily influenced by physician specialty. The results of this study have implications for asthma management in future asthma practice guidelines.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3F47H50C
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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