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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3NQ34

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(Not) Beyond Consumption: Citizen Engagement in Food Politics Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
agriculture
farmers
citizenship
social movement
food studies
production
cultural politics
environmental sociology
community of practice
advocacy
alternative food networks
citizen-consumer hybrid
activism
food politics
sustainable food
consumption
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sprague, Cathryn E
Supervisor and department
Kennedy, Emily Huddart (Environmental Sociology, Washington State University; formerly REES, UofA)
Wittman, Hannah (Land and Food Systems, UBC)
Examining committee member and department
Parkins, John (Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, UofA)
Davidson, Debra (Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, UofA)
Department
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Specialization
Rural Sociology
Date accepted
2014-09-25T13:21:22Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Many accounts of Alternative Food Networks (AFNs) describe them as cohesive social movements that adequately address the social and environmental externalities of food and agricultural production. Yet others question whether initiatives that focus on localized consumer driven change can provide radical transformation of social systems. This thesis takes up this debate, using data from interviews and participant observation of key actors in AFNs in Edmonton, Alberta to explore civic engagement in food politics. While this study sought to go beyond consumption, by integrating data from producers, consumers and everyday citizens, findings indicate that there is an overwhelming emphasis on consumer driven change amongst all groups, bringing into question the efficacy of such approaches. Overall, this thesis emphasizes the need to engage in a food politics that critically examines the root contextual, political, and institutional factors that underpin the negative externalities associated with our food and agricultural systems.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3NQ34
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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