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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3CD1S

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Slimming virtual machines based on filesystem profile data Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
virtual machines
virtualization
fuse
filesystems
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Nickurak, Jeremy
Supervisor and department
Lu, Paul (Computing Science)
Examining committee member and department
Galin, Warren (Biological Sciences)
Nikolaidis, Ioanis (Computing Science)
Department
Department of Computing Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-28T23:04:42Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Virtual machines (VMs) are useful mechanisms for better resource utilization, support for special software configurations, and the movement of packaged software across systems. Exploiting VM advantages in a production setting, however, often requires computer systems with the smallest possible disk-size footprint. Administrators and programmers who create VMs, however, may need a robust set of tools for development. This introduces an important conflict: Minimalism demands that packaged software be as small as possible, while completeness demands that nothing required is missing. We present a system called Lilliputia, which combines resource usage monitoring (through a Linux FUSE filesystem we created called StatFS), with a filtered cloning system, which copies an existing physical or virtual machine into a smaller clone. Finally, we show how Lilliputia can reduce the size of the Trellis Network-Attached-Storage (NAS) Bridge Appliance and the Chemical Shift to 3D Structure protein structure predictor to 10-30% of their original size.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3CD1S
Rights
License granted by Jeremy Nickurak (nickurak@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-28T21:07:21Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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