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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3KW57S44

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Gender-differentiated Innovations in Response to Climate Change: Evidence from Smallholder Agriculture in 4 countries in East Africa Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Gender
Innovation
Climate change
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ngwenya, Kwanele
Supervisor and department
Sandeep Mohapatra (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Martin Luckert (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Varghese Manaloor (Humanities and Social Sciences)
Department
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Specialization
Agricultural and Resource Economics
Date accepted
2014-01-31T09:36:57Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
We investigate gender differentiated innovations regarding maize production among households in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. We find that innovation is positively influenced by access to information assets and on farm water, amount of land, and number of income sources, with Kenya and Tanzania generally having more innovations than Uganda. The most common reasons cited for innovations are improving land productivity and availability, responding to amounts and patterns of rainfall, and increasing crop yields. Some types of innovations vary depending on which gender is responsible for production. Males and females have, respectively, positive and negative impacts on some innovations. Moreover, for some types of innovations, when men, or both men and women, receive forecast information, there is more innovation relative to households that received no information. However, in households where women receive information, some types of innovations decrease. Results also show that some gendered headship structures influence some innovations.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3KW57S44
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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