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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3NW47

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Woodland caribou conservation in the Little Smoky: wolf management and the role of bears Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
bear
species at risk
stable isotopes
trapping
woodland caribou
conservation
wolf management
diet
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Robichaud, Christine B
Supervisor and department
Boyce, Mark S. (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Boutin, Stan (Biological Sciences)
Hudson, Robert (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-10-01T16:14:00Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Masters of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Woodland caribou population declines in west-central Alberta precipitated a wolfcontrol. This program to protect caribou could be compromised if (1) there are strong public pressures against helicopter gunning and strychnine poisoning of wolves and/or (2) other predators compensate to kill caribou. Because bears can be important ungulate predators, I used stable isotope techniques to reconstruct black and grizzly bear diets including contributions of caribou, caribou calves, ants, ungulates (moose, deer and elk), and 3 plant groups. Bears assimilated 2-58% terrestrial protein indicating large variation among individuals. As an alternative to current wolf-control practices, I reviewed spatial and temporal patterns of harvests (1985-2006) on registered traplines. Wolf trapping has increased during the past 2 decades, but on average trappers harvested only 10% of the provincial wolf population, well below culls required to control the population. Under the registered trapline system it is unlikely that trapping could control wolf abundance.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3NW47
Rights
License granted by Christine Robichaud (rbchrist@ualberta.ca) on 2009-09-26T17:55:45Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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2014-04-24T23:32:57.012+00:00
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 1354757
Last modified: 2015:10:12 18:45:25-06:00
Filename: Robichaud_Christine_Fall2009.pdf
Original checksum: 14ef5280e7079b966bd68a123940d6e3
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File title: Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (ASRD). 2007. Little Smoky
File title: University of Alberta
File author: Christine
Page count: 130
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