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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3F71P

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Benthic Responses to Nitrogen and Phosphorus Deposition on Alpine Ponds in Banff National Park: A Replicated Whole-Ecosystem Experiment Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
nutrient limitation
phosphorous deposition
periphyton
alpine
nitrogen deposition
benthic
Canadian Rockies
ponds
whole-ecosytem
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Porter, Lisa, L.
Supervisor and department
Vinebrooke, Rolf (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Proctor, Heather (Biological Sciences)
Douglas, Marianne (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2012-09-28T07:06:56Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorous (P) deposition at high elevations has increased by 40% over the last fifteen years, causing concern for the 3000+ alpine ponds in Banff National Park. A novel whole-ecosystem experiment was used to test for the effects of elevated N and P deposition on benthic communities in 16 ponds using a two-factor (N × P) experimental design. The findings showed periphyton was N-limited, as total chlorophyll was significantly higher in N- and NP-amended ponds, reflecting the positive response by algal groups. Periphyton appeared co-limited by N and P towards the end of the experiment, with strong grazing pressure by abundant populations of fairy shrimp (Branchinecta paludosa). The benthic consumer community consisted mainly of small omnivores (family Chironomidae) and large algal grazers (family Limnephilidae). These findings highlight the strong potential for eutrophication in the pristine high-elevation environments of the Canadian Rockies.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3F71P
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 4260682
Last modified: 2015:10:12 17:12:28-06:00
Filename: FINAL THESIS FOR SUBMISSION TO FGSR.pdf
Original checksum: 0e745d9f65de02d25b7e3de719674259
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File title: LP Thesis Sept 21 2012 with committee's edits
File author: Lisa Porter
Page count: 80
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