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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VM16

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Martin McDonagh's Spatial Narratives and the Reinvention of Theatrical Heterotopias Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Martin McDonagh
Heterotopias
New Brutalist Theatre
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Balcom, Katherine Elizabeth
Supervisor and department
Mounsef, Donia (Drama)
Examining committee member and department
Defraeye, Piet (Drama)
Mounsef, Donia (Drama)
Selman, Jan (Drama)
Hurley, Natasha (English and Film Studies)
Department
Department of Drama
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-09-24T14:04:32Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
At the turn of the 21st century, the New Brutalist theatre movement dominated stages in Britain. Despite the large number of playwrights involved in the movement, few had the same large-scale commercial success as Martin McDonagh. Through his enfant terrible public persona, extreme stage violence and a dystopic yet naturalistic depiction of settings, McDonagh became synonymous with the ‘black pastoral’. This thesis interrogates McDonagh’s theatre and film’s cohesive spatial narrative and the violent logic of the New Brutalists. Current criticism of McDonagh’s theatre generally falls into two distinct camps: one relating to his ‘Irish’ plays and the other dealing with his ‘non-Irish’ plays and film. While both camps deal primarily with how McDonagh manipulates the audience’s perception of space, they divide his oeuvre based on the location of setting. This thesis challenges that division and provides a comprehensive analysis of his spatial manipulations on stage and screen.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VM16
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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