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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3862BH4Z

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Integrative taxonomy of Polygonia Hubner 1819 (Lepidoptera:Nymphalidae) in Alberta Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Digital colour RGB analysis
Species delimitation
Systematics
Lepidoptera
SNPs
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McDonald, Christianne M
Supervisor and department
Sperling, Felix (Biological Sciences)
Acorn, John (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Leys, Sally (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Systematics and Evolution
Date accepted
2015-09-29T10:44:08Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Speciation can be an elaborate process. Delimiting species and reconstructing evolutionary relationships may be similarly complex, revealing gene tree discordance, cryptic species, geographic structuring or hybridization. In order to solve such systematic problems, a careful balance should be struck between evidence from morphology and molecules. Relationships among Polygonia species have been explored using mitochondrial genes (ND1, COI), nuclear genes (wgl, EF-1α, GAPDH, RpS5) and morphology (wing patterns, venation, genitalia), but their topology remains inconclusive, due at least in part to phylogenetic discordance. Here, I used mitochondrial COI gene sequence in tandem with genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods to assess species and subspecies boundaries. I also reconstructed phylogenetic relationships in the genus to further investigate phylogenetic discordance. Distinct genetic clusters resulted from discriminant analysis on principal components (DAPC) of SNPs, while COI sequencing revealed a new mitochondrial lineage, making P. gracilis paraphyletic. Genetic clusters were carried forward into the morphological analysis to serve as prior categories for the specimens. Ten visually scored diagnostic characters selected based on personal observations and appearance in the taxonomic literature clustered the specimens into the same groups as genetic characters, while digital colour analysis of wing areas gave less congruent groupings. I used discriminant correspondence analysis (DCA) of the visually scored characters to compare their diagnostic utility and construct a new species-level dichotomous key. This integrative approach to constructing diagnostic keys supports species identifications that are designed to correspond more closely to genetic clusters.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3862BH4Z
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File author: Christianne
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File language: en-US
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