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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X05XC45

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Disruption of a belowground mutualism alters interactions between plants and their floral visitors Open Access

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Author or creator
Cahill, J. F.
Elle, E.
Smith, G. R.
Shore, B. H.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Mycorrhizae
Pollination biology
Aspen Parkland
Plant-soil interactions
Interactions at multiple trophic levels
Alberta
Canada
Grassland
Mutualisms
Indirect interactions
Community ecology
Kinsella
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
Plants engage in diverse and intimate interactions with unrelated taxa. For example, aboveground. oral visitors provide pollination services, while belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance nutrient capture. Traditionally in ecology, these processes were studied in isolation, reinforcing the prevailing assumption that these above- and belowground processes were also functionally distinct. More recently, there has been a growing realization that the soil surface is not a barrier to many ecological interactions, particularly those involving plants (who live simultaneously above and below ground). Because of the potentially large impact that mycorrhizae and. oral visitors can have on plant performance and community dynamics, we designed an experiment to test whether these multi-species mutualisms were interdependent under field conditions. Using benomyl, a widely used fungicide, we suppressed AMF in a native grassland, measuring plant, fungal, and floral-visitor responses after three years of fungal suppression. AMF suppression caused a shift in the community of. oral visitors from large-bodied bees to small-bodied bees and flies, and reduced the total number of. oral visits per flowering stem 67% across the 23 flowering species found in the plots. Fungal suppression has species-specific effects on. oral visits for the six most common flowering plants in this experiment. Exploratory analyses suggest these results were due to changes in. oral-visitor behavior due to altered patch-level. oral display, rather than through direct effects of AMF suppression on. oral morphology. Our findings indicate that AMF are an important, and overlooked, driver of. oral-visitor community structure with the potential to affect pollination services. These results support the growing body of research indicating that interactions among ecological interactions can be of meaningful effect size under natural field conditions and may influence individual performance, population dynamics, and community structure.
Date created
2008
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X05XC45
License information
Rights
© 2008 Ecological Society of America. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
Citation for previous publication
Cahill, J. F., Elle, E., Smith, G. R., & Shore, B. H. (2008). Disruption of a belowground mutualism alters interactions between plants and their floral visitors. Ecology, 89(7), 1791-801. DOI: 10.1890/07-0719.1.
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