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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3C40N

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How Does Nature Help Women Heal from Sexual Assault: A Narrative Analysis Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Nature
Ecopsychology
Environment
resilience
Sexual Assault
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Moore, Ceri L
Supervisor and department
Van Vliet, Jessica (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Yohani, Sophie (Educational Psychology)
Buck, George (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Counselling Psychology
Date accepted
2013-07-31T16:09:24Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Due to the potentially devastating implications of sexual assault, investigating how women heal in the aftermath of this event is imperative. One method of healing which has received minimal research attention has been spending time in nature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to answer the question: How does nature help women heal from sexual assault? Using a qualitative narrative methodology, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with four female sexual assault survivors from the community. Analysis of interview data resulted in individualized accounts of each woman’s journey of healing through nature. In addition, themes and subthemes reflecting the common elements of healing across participants were generated. These common themes were: providing emotional support, connecting with spirituality, changing the experience of the self, and refocusing attention. Findings are contextualized within the existing literature and implications for practice are provided.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3C40N
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 911289
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:09:42-06:00
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File title: AMARANDA, The Journal of The European Ecopsychology Society (EES), November 2005, Vol 1, 1
File author: Ceri
Page count: 176
File language: en-CA
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