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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3833N14R

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Insights from the performing arts for information professionals who teach Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Polkinghorne, Sarah
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
library instruction
information literacy instruction
teaching
library and information studies
instructional role
performance
Type of item
Conference/workshop Presentation
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
This presentation critiques the discourse of teacher-as-entertainer and examines five elements from the performing arts that can provide meaningful insights for information professionals who teach: physicality, defining the situation, extemporizing, scripts, and acting.
Date created
2014/10/23
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3833N14R
License information
Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
Rights

Citation for previous publication
Earlier version first presented at the 2011 Workshop on Instruction in Library Use (WILU). Subsequently presented for the Partnership Education Institute and in the University of Alberta's School of Library and Information Studies.
Source
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Date Modified
2015-10-01T17:13:32.852+00:00
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File format: vnd.ms-powerpoint (Microsoft PowerPoint 2007+, OpenDocument Text)
Mime type: application/vnd.ms-powerpoint
File size: 5044088
Last modified: 2016:06:24 18:06:43-06:00
Filename: Insights from the Performing Arts SPolkinghorne 2015-03-11.pptx
Original checksum: b6e7e3f9f3bb2503cfbee83c56c6ec5a
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