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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35X3V

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The V0 Interneurons: First-Order Interneurons of the Locomotor CPG? Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
CPG
Locomotion
V0
Interneuron
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Olsen, Fraser G
Supervisor and department
Gosgnach, Simon (Physiology)
Examining committee member and department
Funk, Greg (Physiology)
Waskiewicz, Andrew (Biological Sciences)
Department
Centre for Neuroscience
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-29T04:32:08Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The locomotor Central Pattern Generator (CPG) is a neuronal network capable of producing rhythmic locomotor output independent of sensory or descending input. Attempts to identify component interneurons of the CPG have been aided by the discovery of transcription factors that are expressed by discrete interneuron populations during development. The V0 interneuron population is defined by the expression of the transcription factor Dbx1. Herein I test the hypothesis that V0 interneurons are first-order cells of the locomotor CPG responsible for initiating rhythmic locomotor activity. Anatomical tracing from brainstem sites known to be responsible for the initiation of locomotion reveal that these regions make monosynaptic connections onto V0 cells. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that V0 cells express 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors, previously shown to be required for locomotor initiation. Taken together these results support the hypothesis that V0 interneurons are first-order interneurons of the locomotor CPG responsible for initiating locomotion.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35X3V
Rights
License granted by Fraser Olsen (folsen@ualberta.ca) on 2011-09-28T17:08:44Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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