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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X656

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Effects of parasite exchange between wild and farmed salmon Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
chemical resistance
population ecology
migration
disease
mathematical modelling
population genetics
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ashander, Jaime
Supervisor and department
Lewis, Mark (Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Hillen, Thomas (Mathematical and Statistical Sciences)
Coltman, David (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-20T16:50:48Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Human food production activities can dominate natural systems, altering ecological and evolutionary aspects of the environment. Disease-mediated interactions are of particular concern. For example, parasites may "spill-over'' from farms to wildlife. Parasites isolated on farms can evolve resistance to treatment chemicals , but "spill-back'' from wildlife to farms may alter evolutionary dynamics. Here, we consider exchange of parasites (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) between wild (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and farmed salmon. We derive and analyze discrete-time models that implicitly include wild salmon migrations. First, we extend a standard fisheries model to show parasite exchange affects "line-dominance'' in the population ecology of salmon. Second, we extend a classic population genetics model to show that wild salmon can theoretically provide an "ecosystem service'' by delaying the onset of chemical resistance in parasites on farms. This service, however is affected by a nonlinear feedback if farm parasites spill-back to affect wild salmon.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X656
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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