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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3H708B35

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Development, Stability, and Consequences of Personality in the Juvenile Red Squirrel Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
aggression
activity
ontogeny
Tamiasciurus hudsonicus
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Kelley, Amanda D
Supervisor and department
Stan Boutin (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Cindy Paskowski (Biological Sciences)
Peter Hurd (Psychology)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2014-04-29T13:30:09Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Animal personality – defined as consistent differences in behaviour among individuals – is a growing field in behavioural ecology due to its demonstrated effects on fitness. However, the ontogeny of personality under natural conditions remains relatively unexplored. In this thesis, I examine the development, stability, and consequences of juvenile personality in the North American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). I demonstrate that 1) conditions in early life – particularly sibling relations – influence juvenile personality, 2) both aggression and activity change from juvenile to yearling stages, but activity maintains rank stability, 3) juveniles that gain territories early in the season do not experience a decrease in syndrome deviation, and 4) both dispersal activity and territory acquisition are influenced by juvenile aggression. These results suggest that environmental effects are important in shaping juvenile personality, and personality in turn influences a juvenile’s ability to meet the challenges associated with natal dispersal.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3H708B35
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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